Planning commission – Gonzales For Commissioner http://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/ Sat, 02 Jul 2022 00:00:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-13.png Planning commission – Gonzales For Commissioner http://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/ 32 32 Publication of the final report on the environmental impact of the Nordic Aquafarms project; Planning Commission hearing scheduled for later this month | Lost Coast Outpost https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/publication-of-the-final-report-on-the-environmental-impact-of-the-nordic-aquafarms-project-planning-commission-hearing-scheduled-for-later-this-month-lost-coast-outpost/ Sat, 02 Jul 2022 00:00:49 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/publication-of-the-final-report-on-the-environmental-impact-of-the-nordic-aquafarms-project-planning-commission-hearing-scheduled-for-later-this-month-lost-coast-outpost/ Digital rendering of the fish farm planned by Nordic Aquafarms for the Samoa Peninsula, a five-building complex with a combined footprint of 766,530 square feet. | Image via Humboldt County. ### Ready for some acronyms? Buckle Up: Humboldt County, acting as the lead agency under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), has released […]]]>


Digital rendering of the fish farm planned by Nordic Aquafarms for the Samoa Peninsula, a five-building complex with a combined footprint of 766,530 square feet. | Image via Humboldt County.

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Ready for some acronyms? Buckle Up: Humboldt County, acting as the lead agency under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), has released the Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) for the facility of the recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) that Nordic Aquafarms plans to build on the Samoa Peninsula.

At 1,080 pages, the document, which was prepared by GHD, dives deep into a long list of topics regarding the project’s anticipated environmental impacts. It responds to hundreds of comments submitted by the public and various regulators following the release of the Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) in December.

The project is set to be presented to the Humboldt County Planning Commission on July 28, according to Stacy Atkins-Salazar, who in addition to being the current mayor of Arcata is also an independent contractor working with Nordic to facilitate the community awareness.

The Outpost has not yet gone through the entire document, but in a brief overview, we note that the report addresses some of the most frequently expressed concerns about the RIE project, including the project’s mind-boggling energy consumption, the greenhouse gas emissions, truck traffic and road safety. and the composition of the fish diet, although questions remain – particularly on this last element.

The FEIR notes that many commentators have called for more analysis of truck traffic and questioned whether the predicted truck routes listed in the DEIR are correct. The latest report explains its rationale and methodology and effectively dismisses these concerns by stating that “no new impacts have arisen that have not been properly assessed and found to be less than significant.”

We mentioned the massive power consumption above. At full construction (expected to be completed no earlier than 2030), the project is expected to have an average electricity demand of 22.3 megawatts (one-year average), or 195 gigawatt hours of energy per year. This would represent approximately 21% of the county’s total electricity consumption.

The project description has been updated in the RIRF to reference that Nordic has voluntarily committed to using 100% renewable and/or carbon-free energy. The report says the company is committed to meeting the goals of the Redwood Coast Energy Authority, the county’s local community aggregator of choice for electricity.

“This commitment is not only described as part of the project in the DEIR, but is fully enforceable by the county through the county’s Coastal Development Permit (CDP) terms of approval,” the report said.

However, the company plans to install dual-fuel generators, which would be able to run on natural gas and diesel. “Diesel fuel will be used to provide backup power in the event of a temporary natural gas and power outage,” the report said, adding that these emergency generators “would only be used during required tests … and power outages = blackout”.

When it comes to fish feed, FEIR says the company still hasn’t made a final decision on the feed supplier and can’t say for sure what the ingredients will be.

“It is too early in the process to do so as the sources of ingredients that make up these diets are changing as the aquaculture industry continually strives to improve the sustainability rankings of these ingredients,” the report states. “A feed formulation that may be the best available today may not be the best in the next 4-5 years when operations are expected to begin.”

The report discusses many other aspects of the project, including the potential for fish escape (virtually zero, they say), the impacts of releasing a 1.5 mile drainpipe, handling/the waste disposal and much more.

If you want to download the full report, you can find a link at the top of the page on this link.

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Hanford City Council appoints Dennis Ham to fill Planning Commission seat | Local News https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/hanford-city-council-appoints-dennis-ham-to-fill-planning-commission-seat-local-news/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/hanford-city-council-appoints-dennis-ham-to-fill-planning-commission-seat-local-news/ Hanford City Council voted unanimously this week to appoint Dennis Ham as a new member of the planning commission at a special session. Ham, who has served on the commission three times since the 1990s, will help plan the city’s growth over the next few years. He’s a second-generation Hanford resident who remembers the old […]]]>

Hanford City Council voted unanimously this week to appoint Dennis Ham as a new member of the planning commission at a special session.

Ham, who has served on the commission three times since the 1990s, will help plan the city’s growth over the next few years.

He’s a second-generation Hanford resident who remembers the old town center and its quaint shops like the hot dog stand on Main Street.

He answered questions from council members about the changes he had seen and what he would like to see for the city in the next 20 to 50 years by talking about the pride he feels when he walks or drives in across the city, especially the downtown district.

“I think more can be done not just for the city center but for the whole city to attract more visitors,” Ham said. “I’ve heard visitors say how safe it feels here.”

Ham said he was concerned about land use in the town and noted that many new developments have large homes on ever smaller lots, which he said he didn’t care about. .

“We’re expanding north and south because we’re kind of stuck west and east,” Ham explained.

He said he would also like vacant land to be filled before new land is converted into buildings.

“Something has to give,” he told the council, shaking his head.

Ham said he would also like to see new hotels built in Hanford have larger meeting rooms.

“We want to attract bigger events than we currently are,” he said, adding that the city needed a good way to influence new hotel businesses to provide a meeting space. to visitors.

Council member Art Brieno asked Ham and those present at the meeting in general what they thought would happen when unincorporated areas in the county, such as Armona, were finally incorporated. He expressed concern that smaller communities could provide their residents with facilities such as fire protection.

Other council members expressed similar concerns, particularly about how services such as water were going to be provided to the growing number of people in the area.

“We’re looking for people who are serious about serving the community and have the skills to do their jobs,” Brieno said of the selection process.

Brieno said all of the planning commission nominees have shown great future potential and hope they continue to want to serve and make Hanford an even better place to live.

The Hanford Planning Commission meets every second and fourth Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. in the City Council Chambers of the Civic Auditorium at 400 N. Douty St.

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Woodland Park Planning Commission Recommends Approval of Charis Dormitory Amendment | Mail from Pikes Peak https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/woodland-park-planning-commission-recommends-approval-of-charis-dormitory-amendment-mail-from-pikes-peak/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/woodland-park-planning-commission-recommends-approval-of-charis-dormitory-amendment-mail-from-pikes-peak/ WOODLAND PARK • A city council chamber filled with standing room for a special meeting of the Woodland Park Planning Commission on June 21st. The committee heard a request to modify the proposed unit development/commercial development planned for the Charis Bible College property. Jon Romero submitted the plaintiff NES Inc. application on behalf of New […]]]>

WOODLAND PARK • A city council chamber filled with standing room for a special meeting of the Woodland Park Planning Commission on June 21st.

The committee heard a request to modify the proposed unit development/commercial development planned for the Charis Bible College property. Jon Romero submitted the plaintiff NES Inc. application on behalf of New Life Holding Corporation and its affiliated nonprofit organizations Charis Bible College and Andrew Wommack Ministries.

Romero requested that the planning commission recommend two articles for approval. The first was to change the height of the proposed bunkhouses from 35 feet to 45 feet to accommodate the topography and gable roofs recommended in city design standards. The buildings will remain at three floors.

Usually, these variance requests are made to the city’s board of adjustment, but not in the case of a planned unit development or a planned commercial development. Also, normally, an amendment to the PUD would be approved by the planning commission upfront. But changes to the dimensions of buildings constructed in PUDs require council approval.

Four of the five commissioners present in person and on Zoom agreed that changing the maximum building height to 45 feet was reasonable, given the terrain and city standards.

Commission Chairman Ken Hartsfield wanted to limit the change to just the North Dorm site because, he said, Romero did not present any information justifying the change for the South site.

The commissioners recommended approval by a vote of 4 to 1.

The second request to remove Condition 14 from the original PUD/PBD approval in 2012. It requires temporary student accommodation to be privatized so that it can be taxed separately from the rest of the property.

Condition 14 was created to help the Northeast Teller County Fire Protection District cope with the additional growth imposed by Bible College. NETCO Fire Chief Tyler Lambert said 98% of the department’s funding comes from property taxes.

Bible College and Andrew Wommack Ministries are tax-exempt, but the fire department responds to all emergency calls, which Lambert says have increased with each expansion of the college. He added that although the department has the apparatus to fight a fire in a large building, it does not have the personnel. Between training, equipment and salaries, it costs about $80,000 a year to hire a firefighter, he said.

Department counsel, Andrew Nussbaum of Nussbaum Speir Gleason, said the considerations were irrelevant, illegal, unenforceable and unenforceable.

He cited the Constitution and laws of the United States and the Constitution of Colorado, which exempt all religious organizations from paying taxes.

“Wommack is not asking for special treatment, he is asking for the ministry’s constitutional rights,” Nussbaum said. “It also violates the RLUIPA (Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act).”

The RLUIPA was signed into law by Congress in 2000. According to the United States Department of Justice, “the land use provisions of…the RLUIPA…protect individuals, places of worship and other institutions against discrimination in zoning and land use planning laws”.

Commissioner Carrol Harvey, who also served on the commission in 2012, said the privatization suggestion came from then-college representative Larry Bozeman. She also quoted Wommack in a 2011 article published in the Colorado Springs Independent in which he said he wanted privatization as a good neighbor.

“I read the minutes of that meeting differently,” Nussbaum said. “Tax revenue is not about land use. You don’t have the power to force the ministry to renounce its beliefs.

“We’re not asking him,” Harvey said. “The fire department is impacted because it’s not being helped by taxes from a very large entity.”

In the end, at the suggestion of City Attorney Nina Williams, commissioners voted 4 to 1 to send the issue of privatization to city council without a recommendation. They agreed that the tax and religious aspects of the matter were beyond their purview.

Williams pointed out that the statute of limitations for First Amendment cases has passed.

However, the commissioners decided to recommend retaining the wording of Condition 14 which would require dormitories to provide temporary accommodation for students and not permanent accommodation for staff and administrators.

During public comments, dozens of people, mostly Bible college students or staff, spoke in favor of both demands. In many cases, they asked the commissioners to approve student accommodation, but Harvey pointed out that student accommodation had already been approved. The commission only considered the size issue, she said.

This case is due to be heard by city council on July 21.

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THE BECKER COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION SET P – Detroit Lakes Tribune https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/the-becker-county-planning-commission-set-p-detroit-lakes-tribune-3/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 06:35:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/the-becker-county-planning-commission-set-p-detroit-lakes-tribune-3/ BECKER COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION HOLDS PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the Becker County Planning Commission will hold a visitation on July 6, 2022 at 8:00 a.m. in the 3rd Floor Meeting Room of the County Courthouse de Becker and a public hearing on July 12, 2022, at 6:00 p.m. in the 3rd floor […]]]>

BECKER COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION HOLDS PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the Becker County Planning Commission will hold a visitation on July 6, 2022 at 8:00 a.m. in the 3rd Floor Meeting Room of the County Courthouse de Becker and a public hearing on July 12, 2022, at 6:00 p.m. in the 3rd floor jury assembly room of the Becker County Courthouse, 913 Lake Ave, Detroit Lakes, MN. Public testimony regarding this application will only be received by email, in writing or in person at the hearing. Interested parties are encouraged to submit to the Becker County Department of Planning, Zoning and Land Use written facts, arguments, or objectives by 12:00 p.m. on the day of the hearing. These statements should relate to the suitability of the location and the suitability of the project and should suggest any appropriate changes deemed desirable. New Business: 1. APPLICANT: Brian L Johnson & Julie A Johnson 28191 Mountain Rd Detroit Lakes, MN 56501 Project Location: TBD Highland Dr Detroit Lakes, MN 56501 LEGAL LAND DESCRIPTION: Tax ID Number: 08.0426.000 Section 25 Canton 139 Range 041; 25-139-41 PT SW1/4 SW1/4: COMM SW COR SEC 25, N 427.86′, E 320.06′, S 427.85′, W 320.06′ TO POB. PROJECT APPLICATION AND DESCRIPTION: To request a preliminary plan for a twelve (12) unit common interest community to be known as HIGHLAND STORAGE. 2. APPLICANT: Dana Holland & Shirlee A Holland 1828 Co Hwy 52 Rothsay, MN 56579 Project Location: TBD Thunderbolt Ranch Rd Lake Park, MN 56554 LEGAL LAND DESCRIPTION: Tax ID Number: 06.0422.007 Section 33 Township 138 Range 043; 33-138-43 PT SW1/4 NE1/4, PT NW1/4 SE1/4, PT NE1/4 SE1/4: COMM NW COR SW1/4 NE1/4, S 225.74′, SE 1172.6′ , SW 198′ , SWLY 430.19′ AT POB; ELY 826.9′, SLY 540.05′, W 676.45′, N 704.29′ AT POB. TRACT I. Tax identification number: 06.0422.005 Section 33 Township 138 Rank 043; 33-138-43 PT N1/2 SE1/4: COMM NW COR SW1/4 NE1/4, S 225.74′, SE 1172.6′, SW 198′, SE 782.13′ TO RD, SLY AL RD 741.73′ TOWARDS POB; W 676.45′, S 701.48′, E 410.76′, NE 388.72′ TO RD, NLY AL RD 450.79′ TO POB AKA TRACT C. APPLICATION AND PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Request a preliminary plan for a sixty- seven (67) units called THUNDERBOLT RANCH STORAGE. 3. APPLICANT: Michael D Anderson 213 Willow St E Detroit Lakes, MN 56501 Project Location: 25174 Co Hwy 6 Detroit Lakes, MN LEGAL LAND DESCRIPTION: Tax ID Number: 19.0047.003 Section 04 Township 138 Range 041; 4-138-41 PT GOVT LOTS 3-4, PT SE1/4 NW1/4: COMM CTR SEC 4, W 132′ TO POB; N 165′, E 132′, N 1906.08′, W 66′, N 432.69′, NW 103.08′, N 150.01′, W 1100.2′, SLY AL TH 59 1095.52′, E 300′, NLY 786.06′, E 227.28′ , SELY 599.44′, SLY 614.87′, S 378.12′, SW 894.46′, W 326.92′, W 105.4′, S 58.99′, E 1264.98′ TO POB. PLOT A-2. PROJECT APPLICATION AND DESCRIPTION: To request a preliminary plan for a community of common interest consisting of twenty-two (22) units to be known as LAKER ISLAND STORAGE FIRST ADDITION. 4. APPLICANT: Erica L & Eric Zurn 18633 Co Hwy 14 Callaway, MN 56521 Project Location: TBD 350th St Ogema, MN 56569 LEGAL LAND DESCRIPTION: Tax ID Number: 30.0142.000 Section 33 Township 142 Range 042; NW1/4 FROM NW1/4 APPLICATION AND PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Apply for a Conditional Use Permit to operate a feedlot. 5. APPLICANT: Kevin & Brandi M Schlauderaff 23960 Co Rd 144 Detroit Lakes, MN 56501 Project Location: 24316 Co Rd 144 Detroit Lakes, MN 56501 LEGAL LAND DESCRIPTION: Tax ID Number: 08.0107.003 Section 08 Township 139 Range 041; S1/2 NW1/4 SW1/4 & SW1/4 OF SW1/4 LESS 10 ACRES and tax identification number: 08.0107.002 Section 08 Township 139 Range 041; NW1/4 NW1/4 SW1/4 PROJECT APPLICATION AND DESCRIPTION: Apply for a conditional use permit for mining operations. 6. APPLICANT: Armand C & Maricela Radke 48 Groveland Terr Unit T106 Minneapolis, MN 55403 Project Location: TBD Cty Hwy 29 Frazee, MN 56544 LEGAL LAND DESCRIPTION: Tax ID Number: 10.0549.001 Section 35 Township 139 Range 040 ; PT NE1/4 FROM SE1/4, PT SW1/4 FROM NE1/4, & PT SE1/4 FROM NE1/4; START SW COR NE1/4 SE1/4, TH N 1319.58′ TO SE COR SW1/4 NE1/4 TH W 366.34′, N 1003.48′, E 228.68′, N 76.12′, E 125′, S 17.45′, E 330.36 ‘, SE 496.73′, NE 183.89′, SELY 69.88′, SW 185′, SW 450.09′, SE 614.43’TO HWY, SW AL HWY 1604.47′ TO S LN NE1/4 SE1/4, & W 3.21′ AL S LN TO BEG and tax identification number: 10.0552.002 Section 35 Township 139 Range 040; START 249.58′ NE OF SW COR OF SE1/4 OF NE1/4 TH SE 614.43′ TOWARDS HWY, NE AL HWY 400′ TOWARDS RD, NW AL RD 325.05′, SW 185′ & SW 450.09’ TOWARDS POB. PROJECT APPLICATION AND DESCRIPTION: Apply for a conditional use permit for a non-waterfront multi-unit development for twelve (12) sites/units and to operate horse-related activities with boarding. 7. APPLICANT: JoAnne P Robson Trust PO Box 3739 Lihue, HI 96766 Project Location: 29751 Tageto Rd Ogema, MN 56569 LEGAL LAND DESCRIPTION: Tax ID Number: 32.0413.000 Section 08 Township 141 Range 040; SUGAR BUSH HGTS 4TH LOT 5. PROJECT APPLICATION AND DESCRIPTION: Apply for a conditional use permit to construct a six (6) foot high fence along the right of way of a township road. 8. Modifications: 1) Chapter 11, Section 2, Definitions: Semi-detached 2) Chapter 11, Section 2, Definitions: Lot Width All interested persons are invited to attend or submit written comments. Kyle Vareberg, Planning and Zoning Administrator (Jun 26, 2022) 76193

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of Osceola Appoints Thorman and Johnson to Planning Commission | New https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/of-osceola-appoints-thorman-and-johnson-to-planning-commission-new/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 15:23:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/of-osceola-appoints-thorman-and-johnson-to-planning-commission-new/ The Osceola City Board of Supervisors recently appointed Cindy Thorman and Warren Johnson to fill the vacant seats on the planning commission. At the June meeting, supervisors accepted the resignation of Marianna Schultz. Schultz submitted his resignation letter to council during public comment at the town meeting in May. Supervisor Everson made a motion to […]]]>

The Osceola City Board of Supervisors recently appointed Cindy Thorman and Warren Johnson to fill the vacant seats on the planning commission.

At the June meeting, supervisors accepted the resignation of Marianna Schultz. Schultz submitted his resignation letter to council during public comment at the town meeting in May. Supervisor Everson made a motion to accept Schultz’s resignation effective May 2, 2022.

Supervisor Desmarais made an additional request that the official record reflect “Schultz chose to resign.” Chairman Lindh added that he had spoken with Schultz and “reiterated that his resignation was not a request from the board.”

Everson’s motion to accept the resignation was seconded by Desmarais. The motion is carried. The resignation left two seats vacant on the Planning Commission.

At the May board meeting, a recommendation was made on behalf of President Lindh to appoint Cindy Thorman. At that time, the recommendation did not receive a motion.

Thorman spoke to supervisors during public comments at the June meeting.

“I’m currently the assistant clerk for the town of Osceola and I’ve done it twice. I have also served as Chief Election Inspector for over a year now. I am a founding member of the Osceola Historical Society and currently serve on the Polk County Historical Society. The reason I bring this up is because I am very concerned about our community. I love our community, we have incredible history here in Osceola and Polk County, I want to keep the history here,” she said.

“I have owned two historic buildings in Osceola. One has been listed on the National Parks Register of National Historic Buildings. It was also named the best restaurant building by the state. My partner and I received the “Building of the Year” award from the Chamber of Commerce.

“Currently, I own several types of properties, including residential and waterfront. I have also managed different types of properties including commercial properties. I served on the Polk County Burnett Cooperative Board of Directors for 13 years and received several honors like the Certified Administrator Certificate and the Gold Certified Administrator Certificate,” Thorman said.

“Some of you may question my integrity because of the Blue Rock Quarry project. Let me make it clear that I will recuse myself from any career-related votes, just like any other member would if they there was a conflict of interest with ownership of the properties or a bias towards an item submitted to the Planning Commission.

“The vast majority of decisions and recommendations have little to do with careers. I look forward to serving on the Commission and am open to any questions. Thanks.”

Chairman Lindh asked the board to reconsider the motion to appoint Thorman to the Planning Commission: “She has been a valued member of our community, in my opinion there is no reason not to give her a chance. “, he explained. meetings and I support it.

President Lindh introduced a motion to appoint Thorman to the Planning Commission. Supervisor Cronick seconded the motion. The motion was approved by three votes to two.

Thompson yes; Cronick yes; Lindh yes; Everson no; Desmarais no.

Following Thorman’s nomination, the Board considered an application submitted by Warren Johnson.

Johnson’s application to the Planning Commission describes that he is an independent farmer who has lived in the town of Osceola for 54 years. Johnson is currently Vice Chairman of Ellsworth Creamery. In the past, he served for the Osceola City Council and Ambulance. He describes himself as “open-minded and has experience in both farming and business”.

Johnson explained that he is able to read maps and blueprints and analyze alternatives. His interest in serving as a member of the Planning Commission, “is to bring knowledge about the history of our community. I would like to be involved in future growth and long term planning.

President Lindh introduced a motion to appoint Johnson to the Planning Commission. The motion was given a second by Supervisor Cronick and approved by a majority vote. Thompson yes; Cronick yes; Lindh yes; Everson yes; Desmarais yes.

Both terms are due to end in April 2025.

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Local Scene: Join the Planning Commission – Morgan Hill Times https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/local-scene-join-the-planning-commission-morgan-hill-times/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 22:23:22 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/local-scene-join-the-planning-commission-morgan-hill-times/ Register with the MH urban planning commission The Town of Morgan Hill invites applications from residents interested in serving on the planning commission. The city is recruiting to fill an unexpired term on the seven-member commission, for the term ending June 1, 2025, according to the city’s website. The planning commission approves various permits and […]]]>

Register with the MH urban planning commission

The Town of Morgan Hill invites applications from residents interested in serving on the planning commission. The city is recruiting to fill an unexpired term on the seven-member commission, for the term ending June 1, 2025, according to the city’s website.

The planning commission approves various permits and serves as an advisory body to the city council on matters relating to the growth and development of the city, and on any other matters that may be requested by the council. Each Commissioner serves a four-year term.

Application forms and appointment information is available on the town of Morgan Hill website (https://tinyurl.com/yeyk68hj) or at the City Clerk’s Office, 17575 Peak Ave., Morgan Hill, or by calling 408.779.7271. Applications will be accepted at the City Clerk’s Office until 5:00 p.m. on July 22 or until completed. Interviews before City Council are tentatively scheduled for 5:30 p.m. on August 3.

Convert your territory

In response to the state’s new emergency water conservation regulations, the City of Morgan Hill is encouraging landowners to convert their thirsty landscaping with a water-efficient landscape. The Landscape Rebate Program, offered in partnership with Valley Water, also helps customers upgrade existing irrigation equipment to high-efficiency equipment.

The California State Water Board passed new water conservation restrictions that went into effect June 10, forcing many homeowners to stop using potable water to irrigate non-working lawns, according to a statement from Morgan Hill City Press. The restriction applies to owners and managers of commercial, industrial and institutional properties, including homeowners associations, throughout California.

Non-working turf includes any area of ​​mowed grass ground cover that is ornamental only and not used for human recreational purposes, the press release said.

The emergency regulation does not apply to individual residences, school grounds, sports fields, areas regularly used for civic or community events, and water used for tree maintenance.

The bylaw will remain in effect for one year or until the State Water Board amends, re-enacts or rescinds it, the city’s press release said. A fine of $500 per day may be imposed for violations.

The local landscape discount program is available until June 30 or while funds are exhausted. The program is designed to encourage residents and businesses to convert their water-intensive landscaping to more efficient vegetation or artificial turf and retrofit inefficient sprinkler equipment.

For more information and to register, visit https://www.valleywater.org/saving-water/rebates-surveys/landscape-rebates Where https://www.morgan-hill.ca.gov/440/Water-Conservation.

Lunch at the library

The Santa Clara County Library District is partnering with the Silicon Valley YMCA and Second Harvest Food Bank this summer to provide free on-the-go meals for children ages 0-18 and their caregivers. Meals include breakfast and lunch.

The free lunch program begins June 13 at the Morgan Hill Library, 660 West Main Ave., and June 21 at the Gilroy Library, 350 West Sixth Street in Gilroy. No registration necessary.

Meals can be picked up from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. Monday to Friday, while supplies last.

Locals are graduates of Ohio University

Two Morgan Hill residents, Mildred Cambronero and Alida Pjanic, graduated from Ohio University after the spring 2022 semester. Both earned their Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Nursing degrees.

More than 4,400 students have earned bachelor’s, master’s or doctoral degrees from Ohio University for the spring 2022 semester, a university press release said. The graduates represented many parts of the United States and many countries, including China, Belarus, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Mexico.

Slevin makes the dean’s list

Catherine D. Slevin, of Morgan Hill, has been named to the University of Scranton’s Dean’s List for the spring semester. The Dean’s List recognizes students for academic excellence. A student must have a grade point average of 3.5 or better with a minimum number of credit hours during the semester to be on the dean’s list, a news release said.

Slevin is a junior kinesiology student at the University’s Panuska College of Professional Studies.

Baltazar wins the honors

Jaylene Baltazar of Morgan Hill has been named to Gonzaga University’s Dean’s List for the spring semester. Students must obtain a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 to 3.84 to be listed.

Gonzaga University is a private Catholic university providing a Jesuit education to over 7,500 students. The campus is located near downtown Spokane, Wash.

MH residents are Gonzaga graduates

Brian Steuber, of Morgan Hill, earned a bachelor of science degree in computer science from Gonzaga University this spring, according to a news release. Steuber graduated with cum laude.

Steuber graduated at Gonzaga’s commencement ceremony on May 8.

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Planning Commission holds public hearing on another tidal wave wash – St. Louis Call Newspapers https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/planning-commission-holds-public-hearing-on-another-tidal-wave-wash-st-louis-call-newspapers/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 17:45:10 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/planning-commission-holds-public-hearing-on-another-tidal-wave-wash-st-louis-call-newspapers/ Residents would prefer to see a different use of the property The Tidal Wave Express Car Wash, 5677 S Lindbergh Blvd. A third Tidal Wave car wash could be coming to South County, this time off Butler Hill Road. The St. Louis County Planning Commission heard a proposal June 13 for Tidal Wave Car Wash […]]]>

Residents would prefer to see a different use of the property

The Tidal Wave Express Car Wash, 5677 S Lindbergh Blvd.

A third Tidal Wave car wash could be coming to South County, this time off Butler Hill Road.

The St. Louis County Planning Commission heard a proposal June 13 for Tidal Wave Car Wash to build an express wash facility at 13047 Butler Crest Drive, near the intersection of Butler Hill Road and Tesson Ferry Road. The application is for a conditional use permit in the C-2 Commercial District to construct and operate a car wash facility on the 1.3 acre lot, which is currently vacant. It sits across from the former MetLife Building property, which is being redeveloped into the “Tesson Ridge” mixed-use development.

The proposal is in the 6th district of St. Louis County Councilman Ernie Trakas and the Mehlville School District.

“Along Tesson Ferry Road there are a number of commercial uses,” said planner Gretchen Arnold. “Behind the commercial facade, there are several single-family homes.”

Brandon Harp, director of Civil Engineer Design, said Tidal Wave is a relatively new company in the St. Louis area, with a total of 11 locations open or about to open. This includes two South County locations in Sunset Hills and Concord, as well as a location near Fenton.

According to Harp, the drive-thru car wash would be approximately 4,500 square feet in size and include an office element. There would be 24 vacuum bays for customer use and the proposed hours are 7am to 8pm. There is a full-access shared drive with a nearby Tesson Ferry McDonald’s. There is also a stormwater pond on the adjacent parcel and Harp said they will subdivide the lot to add an additional stormwater pond on the Tidal Wave property.

“There are three stacking lanes and pay gates through which the cars will stack before going through the car wash. It’s a car wash where you don’t get out of your car,” Harp said.

During public comment, neighboring resident Brian Daus questioned the need for another car wash in the area. There is a Zip car wash about three minutes down the proposed tidal wave road at 12884 Tesson Ferry.

“We are about four or five in this area who are quite close to Ernie Trakas. … We relay our neighborhood concerns to him quite often,” Daus said. “When we found out (the tidal wave), we sent out a few emails and the big consensus is this…there are already, I think, five car washes within a two-mile radius… if you include those at gas stations…. I think if residents have a choice, this property should be something we need.

Daus, who added that his family is a member of Tidal Wave Car Wash, said with Tesson Ridge developing across the street, it would be nice to see better restaurants or retail in the region.

Commissioner William Ballard asked what happened to the sewage from the facility. Harp said sewage is collected and treated by a receiver before returning to the public sewer system.

“We had to complete a sewage survey with MSD (Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District) to acknowledge that we put in this sanitary sewer,” Harp said. “There are internal drains in the building that collect the water that sprays the car.”

Ballard further asked if there was a way to recycle the dirty water from the car wash to be reused in the wash, but Harp said that with the chemicals and solvents coming from the cars, he probably wouldn’t. not good for equipment to recycle water.

The panel will make a recommendation on the plan at an upcoming executive meeting.

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🌱Special Planning Commission meeting set + safer driving needed! https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1special-planning-commission-meeting-set-safer-driving-needed/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 00:51:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1special-planning-commission-meeting-set-safer-driving-needed/ Hello friends! I’m back with your new edition of the Avon-Avon Lake Daily. Keep reading for the most important things happening around town. First, today’s weather forecast: Sunny and pleasant. High: 72 Low: 60. Here are today’s top four stories at Lake Avon-Avon: With the high risk of high rip currents this weekend in the […]]]>

Hello friends! I’m back with your new edition of the Avon-Avon Lake Daily. Keep reading for the most important things happening around town.


First, today’s weather forecast:

Sunny and pleasant. High: 72 Low: 60.


Here are today’s top four stories at Lake Avon-Avon:

  1. With the high risk of high rip currents this weekend in the region, here are some top tips from the National Weather Service (NWS) on how to survive if you are caught in a rip current. The first thing is to relax! According to NWS, “rip currents don’t pull you down. A rip current is a natural treadmill that moves at an average speed of one to two feet per second, but has been measured at a speed of eight feet per second, which is faster than an Olympic swimmer Trying to swim against a rip current will only drain your energy – the energy you need to survive and escape the rip current. swim straight towards the shore Swim along the shore until you escape the pull of the current When you are free from the pull of the current, swim at an angle away from the current towards the shore If you feel you can’t reach the shore, relax, face the shore and call or wave for help. Remember: if in doubt, don’t go out!” (Town of Avon Lake, OH via Facebook)
  2. Drivers beware! According to Clevland 19, “Results of a new review by the Lorain County Traffic Death Review Board, showed that 10 people died in crashes from January 2 through May 2. This paints a worrying picture for drivers in the region. According to the Ohio State Highway Patrol, that’s the same number of fatalities in the same time period as 2021, and fatalities are currently on track to reach last year’s numbers.”(Cleveland 19)
  3. An Avon dad celebrates Cleveland, counts and colors with a new children’s book. (WKYC.com)
  4. There will be a special meeting of the Planning Commission on June 20 at 7:00 p.m. in the council chambers. An agenda item includes the request from Kopf Construction Corp, 420 Avon Belden Road, Avon Lake for recommendation for City Council approval of the improvement plans for Phase No. 1 of the Portside Subdivision. The project is located on the south side of Walker Road, between Lear Road and South Port Drive, in an R1A single family residential PUD zoning district. (Lake Avon)

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This is when the Planning Commission learned that John Ford was not, in fact, leaving for Fort Bragg | Lost Coast Outpost https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/this-is-when-the-planning-commission-learned-that-john-ford-was-not-in-fact-leaving-for-fort-bragg-lost-coast-outpost/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 21:59:51 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/this-is-when-the-planning-commission-learned-that-john-ford-was-not-in-fact-leaving-for-fort-bragg-lost-coast-outpost/ Screenshot of Thursday’s Humboldt County Planning Department meeting. PREVIOUSLY: Humboldt County Planning and Construction Director John Ford resigns ### As last night’s meeting of the Humboldt County Planning Commission drew to a close, Director of Planning and Construction John Ford confirmed that he would not be stepping down next week to […]]]>


Screenshot of Thursday’s Humboldt County Planning Department meeting.

PREVIOUSLY: Humboldt County Planning and Construction Director John Ford resigns

###

As last night’s meeting of the Humboldt County Planning Commission drew to a close, Director of Planning and Construction John Ford confirmed that he would not be stepping down next week to take up a position. city ​​manager of Fort Bragg after all.

This revelation from Ford, who gave his opinion late last month, seemed to surprise and delight the commissioners.

Planning commissioner Melanie McCavour had asked Ford if this would be her last meeting before she left for her new gig. Ford paused for a few moments, picked up a stack of papers, and patted them on the table before answering.

“Well,” he said, “I tried to respect the city of Fort Bragg, but since Lost – or, uh, Redheaded Blackbelt already leaked that, uh, no.”

Listen to the reactions of the curators in the video below:

For the record, while Redheaded Blackbelt editor Kym Kemp was the first local reporter to publish the news, it is not fair to say that she “leaked” it. Earlier today, the City of Fort Bragg released a press release, which Kemp issued about 40 minutes after the meeting began last night.

The press release says Ford changed his mind due to family issues, including the challenge of changing his middle school son as well as “his wife’s desire to stay where they are.”

Ford’s expression as he relays this news is inscrutable. Is he upset? Discouraged? Overjoyed? Hard to say. But the joy of the commissioners is obvious.

Chairman Alan Bongio can be heard starting the word ‘congratulations’ before catching up and changing course. “Well, thank you,” he said.

Commissioner Mike Newman simply exclaims, “What?

“Are you staying permanently?” asks McCavour.

“Uh, yeah – well, as definitely as it gets,” Ford replies philosophically.

Amid constant expressions of surprise, Bongio said, “Well, I’ll be the first to tell you, it’s the best thing for our county.”

If you listen carefully, you can hear someone – Commissioner Thomas Mulder, perhaps? – express sympathy: “I’m sorry, man.”

Whatever the appropriate response — congratulations or condolences — Ford will remain the county’s director of planning and construction for the foreseeable future.

Here is the press release from the City of Fort Bragg:

John H. Ford of Humboldt County has requested the release of his contract recently approved by the Fort Bragg City Council. Mr. Ford cited reasons for conflict during the transition from his son’s college to Fort Bragg and his wife’s desire to stay where they are.

Mr Ford said: “It would place a significant stress on my family and not allow me to be as socially involved in the Fort Bragg community as the job requires.”

He goes on to say, “It’s a tough realization for me. I love the community and was drawn to the cohesiveness of the town council and to you as individuals. I am impressed with the staff I have met and the impressive list of successful projects they have undertaken. From my perspective, Fort Bragg is well managed and has a bright future. Fort Bragg deserves a leader who isn’t torn between serving the community and having to go out of their way to support distant immediate family.

“While we are all disappointed with the loss of Mr. Ford as the next City Manager, we understand the priority of family first and the need to follow priorities in this situation,” Mayor Bernie Norvell said. The City will move forward and move in a positive direction.

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County Planning Commission recommends rezoning application for major development near Peletier | New https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/county-planning-commission-recommends-rezoning-application-for-major-development-near-peletier-new/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 17:41:28 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/county-planning-commission-recommends-rezoning-application-for-major-development-near-peletier-new/ BEAUFORT — The Carteret County Planning Commission voted late Monday to recommend county commissioners approve a development company’s application to rezone 82.31 acres of property off West Fire Tower Road and Amphitheater Drive near Peletier for a major residential project. West Fire Tower Road is adjacent to Peletier Loop Road, which connects to Highway 58. […]]]>

BEAUFORT The Carteret County Planning Commission voted late Monday to recommend county commissioners approve a development company’s application to rezone 82.31 acres of property off West Fire Tower Road and Amphitheater Drive near Peletier for a major residential project.

West Fire Tower Road is adjacent to Peletier Loop Road, which connects to Highway 58.

The Planning Commission meeting was held in the County Commission Chambers in the Courthouse Square Administration Building.

According to the county’s rezoning notice sent to nearby property owners, The Hamptons on the White Oak is to include 167 single-family homes, townhouses, bungalows and cabins with the possible amenities of a tennis court, chapel, d a dog park, a petanque and pickleball court. , walking trails and a marina.

The proposal comes from Dirt2Dreams LLC, which, according to the North Carolina Secretary of State’s website, has its main office at 8291 Crew Drive in Emerald Isle. Specifically, the request is to rezone the area from B-1 (General Business District), R-15 (Single Family Residential District and R-20 (Single Family Residential District) to R-10CZ (Conditional Single Family Residential District Zoning District) .

The site was once known as “Worthy of the Lamb”, after a long-running religious play performed in the amphitheater.

Also at Monday’s meeting, the committee:

O Recommended County Commissioners approve an application by James Johner to rezone a 12-acre property at 1671 Highway 101, Beaufort, from IW-CU (Industrial Use and Wholesale District to B-1CZ (District of general zoning for businesses).

O Filed an application by Bryan and Sherlene Leach to rezone a 1.64 acre property at 1212 Highway 24, Newport from R-20 (single family residential district) to B-1 (general business district).

O Recommended County Commissioners approve an application by Linwood Parker for Preliminary Approval of Dishes for Indian Trace Village.

This proposed subdivision would consist of nine residential lots on a 13.38 acre property at 1337 Route 101, Beaufort.

O Recommended County Commissioners Grant Preliminary Approval for Phases Two and Three of Ballantine Grove by Salt Creek Holdings, LLC.

This proposed development would consist of 53 residential lots on a 120.84 acre property near Highway 24, Newport.

None of the planning commission‘s recommendations are on the agenda for consideration by the county commissioners at their Monday evening meeting.

Contact Brad Rich at 252-864-1532; email brad@thenewstimes.com; or follow Twitter @brichccnt.

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