County commissioner – Gonzales For Commissioner http://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/ Sat, 02 Jul 2022 00:46:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-13.png County commissioner – Gonzales For Commissioner http://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/ 32 32 Campbell County Candidate Questionnaire: Don Hamm for County Commissioner https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/campbell-county-candidate-questionnaire-don-hamm-for-county-commissioner/ Sat, 02 Jul 2022 00:46:19 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/campbell-county-candidate-questionnaire-don-hamm-for-county-commissioner/ GILLETTE, Wyo.– County 17 sent out a questionnaire to candidates in the August primary election. Here are the answers from Campbell County Commissioner candidate Don Hamm. Please introduce yourself and describe your educational and professional background. Please include your name and hometown and highlights of Campbell County’s past involvement. I’m Don Hamm and I’m running […]]]>

GILLETTE, Wyo.– County 17 sent out a questionnaire to candidates in the August primary election. Here are the answers from Campbell County Commissioner candidate Don Hamm.

  1. Please introduce yourself and describe your educational and professional background. Please include your name and hometown and highlights of Campbell County’s past involvement.

I’m Don Hamm and I’m running for Campbell County Commissioner. My family moved to the county in 1916. In 1940 my grandfather bought the ranch where I was born, raised and where I live today with my wife Melody, my daughter Lexi and the Lexi’s husband, Paden, making it a fifth generation operation.

After graduating from Campbell County High School, I went to the University of Wyoming where I earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree in agricultural economics. Prior to returning to the family ranch, my background included working for the Wyoming State Department of Agriculture as a State Statistician, the Conservation Service as a State Economist, Johnson County Weed and Pest as county superintendent and Sheridan College as a teacher, taking me to communities across the state before returning to Campbell County in 1979.

My service to serve Campbell County is not new, I have served on the Campbell County Public Lands Board, Campbell County Health Care Foundation Board, Powder Energy Board River on the board of the Cooperative Farmers Association and I am a board member of the Wyoming Stockgrowers Association. I was appointed by the Commissioners in February 2022 to fill a vacant Commissioner position and have enjoyed serving the citizens of Campbell County.

  1. Why did you decide to run for this position? Compared to the other candidates running in this election, why are you the best candidate for this position?

It’s all about the future for me. I want to see the sixth generation continue my family’s legacy in Campbell County. I also want Campbell County to continue to be the safe and prosperous place where I grew up and raised my family. Campbell County is who I am and I want to be able to give back to the community that built me.

Having served as Campbell County Commissioner, I understand the requirements and duties of the office. My lifelong experience in Campbell County provides me with valuable insight into the culture and needs of Campbell County. I have experienced the ups and downs of our local economy and seen the positive and negative attributes associated with both. When faced with an issue, I gather the necessary data and public input to make the best decisions for ALL the citizens of Campbell County.

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  1. The position you are applying for has minimum criteria. Do you believe there are any additional qualifications that would help the person in this role be best suited for the position? If so, how do you meet these additional qualifications? And in what ways can you improve as a leader?

I believe that a person running for this office should have a working knowledge of government budgets, procedures and policies. Through my past experience on county and state councils and as current county commissioner, I have acquired this knowledge. I have already followed a budget session and I understand better how the county budget works.

I can improve as a leader by working on the communication of information between the Board of Commissioners and the citizens as well as by listening to the concerns of the citizens. It will also help make Campbell County government more transparent to the citizens of the county.

  1. How have you approached the challenges you have encountered working with officials, government agencies and the public? What do you think the Board of County Commissioners can improve in its relationship with other entities?

When faced with challenges while working with officials, government agencies, or the public, I listen to all aspects of the challenge, do my own research, ask questions, and work with each party to find a solution. . Most of the time, the best way to overcome a challenge is to sit down with all parties, discuss the situation, and find a compromise acceptable to both parties.

The Board of Commissioners must improve the channels of communication and transparency with all entities and citizens. It is crucial that citizens are aware and understand what is happening in the county in order to offer their input.

  1. What is your vision for the future of Campbell County? If so, what new initiatives would you like to implement if elected?

I want Campbell County to continue to be a safe and prosperous place where citizens can raise their families. With the help of resources like the Innovation Center, I foresee opportunities for new uses of our natural resources. I see Campbell County continuing to expand its industrial base, providing quality jobs for citizens and encouraging growth.

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Any possibility of maintaining or expanding our economy must be considered. Campbell County currently has policies in place to implement any initiatives that arise. The Commission and the county must be willing to adapt and change as needed.

  1. What are the biggest challenges facing Campbell County that the Board of County Commissioners can address? How do you plan to answer it? How can Campbell County prepare for future economic downturns resulting from volatile energy markets and a global shift away from coal?

Every industry that Campbell County relies on is part of a volatile market. Volatile markets are something Campbell County has overcome for years. Campbell County has weathered many downturns and thrived through the ups. As Commissioners, we must do what we can to make the recession less of an impact on citizens. It is essential during a rise to remember sooner or later that there will be a fall. To do this, as commissioners and citizens, we must save during the good times to survive the bad times by spending only what is necessary. In addition, it is crucial to continue to provide funds for projects such as the Center for Innovation. The research of the Innovation division is essential to develop in these markets.

I believe another challenge that Campbell County faces is the 30 by 30 initiative of current administrations. This is something that one way or another will negatively affect all citizens of Campbell County. As commissioners, we need to keep abreast of this plan in order to inform our citizens of what is happening. The current administration wants to kill everything Campbell County was made on and we have to be prepared to overcome that.

  1. How will you effectively manage taxpayers’ money? Do you plan to promote changes to existing taxes? If yes, why? Should part of the county budget be protected from cuts? If so, what area of ​​the budget and why should it be protected from any cuts?

I believe the best way to manage taxpayers’ money is to spend only what is necessary and save any excess. Campbell County is only one of two counties in Wyoming that does not enforce the 12-point maximum levy and every effort should be made to maintain it. I think the road and bridge, fire department and sheriff’s office need to be funded for safety and quality of life in Campbell County. Each budget item should be thoroughly reviewed and only fund the items that are best suited to taxpayers.

  1. Are county land use regulations and permitting processes sufficient to ensure the public interest or are they too onerous?

I am a firm believer in private property rights as long as the best interests of the land, neighborhood and surrounding people are considered. If you take care of the earth, the earth will take care of you.

  1. Anything else voters should know about you?

Keeping taxes low while being able to provide essential services is my number one goal. I wish to serve all citizens of Campbell County, both urban and rural. I come with no other objective than to serve the citizens to the best of my ability. My phone number is listed in the phone book, on the county website, and on my personal website, donhamm.com. I welcome all phone calls and will listen and answer your questions and concerns. I would appreciate your vote on August 16e.

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Kevin Ross continues to hold a big lead in the overall race for Weld County Commissioner https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/kevin-ross-continues-to-hold-a-big-lead-in-the-overall-race-for-weld-county-commissioner/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 03:44:06 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/kevin-ross-continues-to-hold-a-big-lead-in-the-overall-race-for-weld-county-commissioner/ Kevin Ross quickly took the lead in the race for Weld County Commissioner, and the former Eaton mayor never looked back to hold a solid lead over Elijah Hatch on Tuesday evening during a a Republican primary election. Kevin Ross is running for seat on the Weld County Board of Commissioners Ross, who also served […]]]>

Kevin Ross quickly took the lead in the race for Weld County Commissioner, and the former Eaton mayor never looked back to hold a solid lead over Elijah Hatch on Tuesday evening during a a Republican primary election.

Kevin Ross is running for seat on the Weld County Board of Commissioners

Ross, who also served as county commissioner in 2020, cast more than 15,000 votes — nearly double Hatch’s total (8,117) — with the first release of Republican contest results from the Clerk’s Office and Weld County recorder early Tuesday evening.

Ross led Hatch with 17,413 votes to 9,512 votes at 9:15 p.m.

“Yeah, we’re very excited and I think the first fall is critical,” Ross said Tuesday night. “We are confident in this race, and speaking with several of my advisers across the county, we feel good. We are delighted and have our work cut out for us.

In all likelihood, Ross will become the Republican nominee for the at-large seat in November. No Democrats declared themselves for the seat. Ross said it’s possible he could face a challenge from a candidate written for November.

Either way, Ross’ name will appear on another ballot for the general election this fall.

Until then, Ross has said he will attend and attend county meetings, so he is set to take the commissioner seat early next year.

“My goal on January 1 is to be operational,” he said. “Weld County residents deserve it.”

Ross served as Weld County Commissioner in 2020, winning his nomination following the resignation of Sean Conway in early January.

Ahead of Tuesday’s primary, Ross said he plans to keep Weld County debt-free without raising taxes. It also plans to protect and secure water rights in the county, support the oil, gas and agricultural industries, and address transportation issues.

It was approved by current commissioners Steve Moreno, Scott James and Weld County Sheriff Steve Reams.

Hatch, a business owner and former Weld County Council member, said ahead of the election that he hoped to make the county “even more business-friendly”, if elected. He also said he would protect water in the county, support oil and gas, fight for limited government and uphold individual freedoms.

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County commissioner compares homelessness in Billings with Missoula https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/county-commissioner-compares-homelessness-in-billings-with-missoula/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 20:37:52 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/county-commissioner-compares-homelessness-in-billings-with-missoula/ KGVO News received an update on the status of the Reserve Street homeless camp on Monday from Missoula County Commissioner Josh Slotnick, who also responded to Attorney General Austin Knudsen’s recent comments regarding the homeless situation. on Talk Back. Slotnick said Monday there were no longer any residents occupying the area under the Reserve Street […]]]>

KGVO News received an update on the status of the Reserve Street homeless camp on Monday from Missoula County Commissioner Josh Slotnick, who also responded to Attorney General Austin Knudsen’s recent comments regarding the homeless situation. on Talk Back.

Slotnick said Monday there were no longer any residents occupying the area under the Reserve Street Bridge.

“Right now, to my knowledge, no one lives under the Reserve Street Bridge, which is a big win,” Commissioner Slotnick said. “There has been some legal activity and I want to give you an update on that. So, at the end of last week, the judge extended the temporary restraining order and essentially made it a preliminary injunction, which means that if someone is camping there, there is a court order. and sheriff’s deputies can evict them.

Slotnick said the new licensed camp on Clark Fork Drive is working successfully, but also provided an update on the small pre-built shelters that will replace the temporary secure outdoor space.

“We just got an approach permit from MDT (Montana Department of Transportation), which is a huge step forward,” he said. “So we are really close to starting construction on the site. It still needs to be classified and upgraded and then we’ll start to put those things in place and I really hope that in the fall they’ll be in place and that would mean that people who are at the temporary secure outdoor area near Buckhouse Bridge then we’ll move on to these smaller more permanent 120 square foot shelters.

Slotnick referenced a recent Talk Back interview with Montana Attorney General Austin Knudsen, which answered a listener’s question about how to alleviate the homeless situation in Missoula. He said “Missoula needs to vote better”.

“Absolutely,” Slotnick said. “So reading this, I’m just going to call it what it is; we’re talking about Democrats and Republicans, right? We only have those two parties, so according to the Attorney General, if only we had a republican leadership we wouldn’t have a homeless problem so the truth to show how wrong it is to visit Billings.

Slotnick recalled a recent meeting he attended in Billings and his experience with that town’s homeless population.

“There are more homeless people on the streets of downtown Billings at nine o’clock on a Tuesday night than there were non-homeless people, and Billings provides nothing in terms of services compared to that. what we do,” he said. . “So here is the proof. You can have Republican leadership that delivers nothing and you still get homelessness. The difference is that we have homeless people living in a place where they throw their rubbish in the trash and go to the toilet in the bathroom.

Slotnick said he hopes to see the new shelters adjacent to low-income Trinity apartments available this fall.

24 Missoula businesses that have closed in the past two years

A large number of Missoula businesses have closed over the past two years for various reasons. Retirement, COVID-19, change of ownership…here’s a list of 24 businesses we’ve lost.

24 Closed Missoula Businesses We Wish We Could Bring Back

We asked Missoulians which of their favorite businesses that have shut down would they like to see make a triumphant return. Here’s what they found.

28 Missoula Businesses That Opened, Changed Owners, or Changed Locations

Yes, there were quite a few Missoula businesses that closed in the last two years. But what about the Missoula businesses that have opened?

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County commissioner candidate Elaina Shively gets results https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/county-commissioner-candidate-elaina-shively-gets-results/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 22:03:23 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/county-commissioner-candidate-elaina-shively-gets-results/ By Marta Loachamin I hope you will join me in supporting Elaina Shively for Boulder County Commissioner. As an elected official who knows this job and has worked in the courthouse, virtually, in a pandemic, during the Marshall fire and preparing for another budget season and distribution of American Rescue Plan Act funding – I […]]]>

By Marta Loachamin

I hope you will join me in supporting Elaina Shively for Boulder County Commissioner. As an elected official who knows this job and has worked in the courthouse, virtually, in a pandemic, during the Marshall fire and preparing for another budget season and distribution of American Rescue Plan Act funding – I have direct insight into what our 2,300 employees need and what projects will need support from our leadership team.

I knew Elaina for her work in the community. She shows up, fiercely defends and lends a helpful hand. Her work in the District Attorney’s Office uniquely qualifies her to join us in the County Commissioners Office. She has led some of the state’s most forward-thinking and effective programs, tackling the underlying causes of crime and keeping our community safe. She is an ally to historically excluded communities and leverages her position to ensure everyone has a seat at the table and a voice in the discussion.

Marta Loachamin (Marta Loachamin/Courtesy photo)

As Boulder County considers some of our biggest upcoming projects, I know that Elaina’s expertise will complement our current leadership team, making us a very effective board on behalf of Boulder County:

Mental Health: Boulder County residents told us in a survey this spring that addressing mental and behavioral health issues is one of their top priorities and needs. The implementation of the Boulder County Behavioral Health Center will provide a significant increase in services. Elaina has been at the table since the hub’s inception and will continue to be a strong advocate for mental health services in Boulder County. His leadership in developing the state’s first mental health diversion program will be well used to oversee this new program.

Establishment of alternative sentences: In 2018, Boulder County voters approved a tax extension to help upgrade the Boulder County Jail and build an alternative sentencing facility. This new building and the programming within it is part of our ongoing commitment to providing mental health treatment, addiction treatment, and general rehabilitation services more effectively. The Commissioner’s oversight of this project is crucial to voter transparency, which Elaina’s track record will most effectively achieve.

Housing affordability: In the same spring survey, residents listed housing as their top concern. In order to address housing access and affordability in a meaningful way, we need County Commissioners who will look at all options, finding unique and innovative solutions, which is what Elaina excels at. In addition to my experience in housing and the policy work of our office, we will spearhead progress with the Regional Housing Partnership.

Climate action: Boulder County continues to be a leader in the fight against climate change. Our Office of Sustainability, Climate Action and Resilience is home to some of the best and brightest in the business, working to keep Boulder County at the forefront of action. What the next Boulder County Commissioner needs is someone who believes in this work, empowers the staff team to do what they are great at, and collaborates outside of our immediate community. to encourage others to do the same. We cannot fix climate change as a county. We can make a real difference if we are able to be leaders on Capitol Hill and collaborate with our neighboring leaders, as Elaina has shown.

In addition to Elaina’s experience and successes, I have seen her come to the table with an open mind and a willingness to listen. His list of endorsers speaks of it; she has a lot of people supporting her on opposite sides of the issues. This is because she is adept at listening to concerns and collaborating to find solutions or compromises that can help the most people.

A collaborative, community-focused public servant will support community engagement and trust-building work with local government at the County Commissioners Office. Please join me in voting for Elaina Shively for County Commissioner by this Tuesday, June 28th.

Marta Loachamin is the Boulder County Commissioner, District 2, who writes in a personal capacity. She previously worked in real estate, education and as a consultant.

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GUEST COLUMN: Candidate for election as County Commissioner | Opinion https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/guest-column-candidate-for-election-as-county-commissioner-opinion/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/guest-column-candidate-for-election-as-county-commissioner-opinion/ Hi there! I am Sheryl Arthur Lacy and I ask that you consider me County Commissioner of District 3 when you vote in the June 28 primary election. I was born and raised in Stillwater, Oklahoma and more importantly District 3. I have four wonderful children – three sons and one daughter who have graciously […]]]>

Hi there! I am Sheryl Arthur Lacy and I ask that you consider me County Commissioner of District 3 when you vote in the June 28 primary election.

I was born and raised in Stillwater, Oklahoma and more importantly District 3. I have four wonderful children – three sons and one daughter who have graciously helped me throughout this campaign. I’m a partner on a cow-calf operation on the east side of Stillwater. I am a lifelong pioneer with a passion for public service in Payne County and I feel it is time for a fresh perspective in this office.

Over the past four years, I have managed facilities valued at $30 million and spanning over 20 acres. In this role, I learned how to work in a variety of conditions, including day-to-day management, long-range planning, major event execution, and emergency situations. My dad was a county commissioner for 16 years and I learned a lot watching him devote his life to our county. While the knowledge I gained from my father will be invaluable, I also intend to chart my own course when I take office. I plan to listen to the needs of my constituents and respond to concerns that affect the county. If a constituent calls and says their road is in trouble, I will check the budget and do my best to get that road fixed in a timely manner.

I would like to take Country Club Road to Hwy 33 for alternate routes to sporting events. I also want to establish designated truck routes to reduce traffic on our busiest roads. Not only will I strive to keep our roads in top condition, but I also want to make sure our county is as safe as possible. The county commissioner‘s office isn’t just about roads. The Tri-District Board of County Commissioners governs the tax affairs of Payne County. This means that tasks such as: buying and selling public lands, maintaining county property inventories, and implementing economic development programs for the county fall under our responsibilities.

The last point is for me of the utmost importance. I think economic growth is sometimes overlooked at the county level. I see Payne County in a unique position to be the best county in the state if we have the right policies in place to foster an atmosphere of growth among our citizens. Therefore, as your District 3 Commissioner, I will not only do my normal duties of maintaining over 600 miles of District roads, but I will go above and beyond to seek opportunities for economic growth in the county. . I believe I will be a valuable asset to the County Board of Commissioners which serves as the county’s chief administrative body. Although I may not have direct experience working in the county office, I have a desire to learn how I can be the best commissioner I can be in the six months before I take office and continue to improve throughout my tenure. I want to address the concerns of my constituents and act on their behalf for the good of the district and the county.

I would love the opportunity to be your next county commissioner. So, for June 28, vote for the big blue sign!

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Douglas County Commissioner says Daniels Park up for grabs, Hancock denies contact | Colorado Politics https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/douglas-county-commissioner-says-daniels-park-up-for-grabs-hancock-denies-contact-colorado-politics/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/douglas-county-commissioner-says-daniels-park-up-for-grabs-hancock-denies-contact-colorado-politics/ Daniels Park is still up for grabs, according to a Douglas County commissioner who said he plans to meet with Denver Mayor Michael Hancock about taking over the iconic Mile High City property. But Hancock is out of office this week and has not heard from Douglas County Commissioner George Teal, according to Denver Communications […]]]>

Daniels Park is still up for grabs, according to a Douglas County commissioner who said he plans to meet with Denver Mayor Michael Hancock about taking over the iconic Mile High City property.

But Hancock is out of office this week and has not heard from Douglas County Commissioner George Teal, according to Denver Communications Director Theresa Marchetta.

“He had no contact with him. None,” Marchetta said.

Teal spoke with at least one Denver City Council member about the issue. Candi CdeBaca told The Denver Gazette that she and Teal spoke last week.

Beneath the property fight is speculation that Teal mentioned the land seizure in retaliation for an ordinance banning the concealed carry of firearms in parks that Denver approved for its buildings and parks last month.

A recent post that appears to have been written by Teal on a conservative Facebook page stated that he was considering using county eminent domain powers to “seize the park from Daniel (sic) of the city and county of Denver at the light of their recent rulings that affect our constitutional rights guaranteed by the 2nd Amendment.

The Denver Gazette received a screenshot of the message from Douglas County Commissioner Lora Thomas. Last week, the group voted 2-1 to consider what it would take to take over the park. Thomas was the only dissenter.

The Denver City Council’s vote on hidden carry was also not unanimous. Three of the 12 council members, including CdeBaca, voted against the ban because they felt there was no need to ban concealed carry in the parks. City Council member Kevin Flynn, one of three who voted against the ban, said no concealed permit holder had ever been arrested for misusing a firearm in a park. the city.

He told The Denver Gazette that because of Teal’s comments, he would support revisiting the issue, but suspects there won’t be seven votes to change it.

“No one would take the threat of eminent domain seriously,” he said.

Teal’s comments touched a nerve with Denver Parks and Recreation officials when they surfaced last week.

Lawyers for both sides dug into the issue trying to determine whether one government can seize another government’s property.

Holland & Hart estate lawyer Tim Gordon said he had never seen eminent domain used in this way before.

“It’s strange. Yes, Douglas County can normally take property to create a park, but it’s already a park,” said Gordon, who added that the hype around Daniels Park sounds like political bluster. “There could be some chest puffs. But even if Douglas County can do that, they’ll have to pay for the land.”

Gordon said the eminent domain process would be messy. To seize the property using eminent domain, Douglas County would first have to file a motion for conviction with the courts and there would be a briefing and probably a hearing to determine if the county could take the land.

If the court approves the seizure, then there would be a trial to determine the value of the land. The county would not be included in this process, eventually making the decision up to voters.

Scott Gilmore, Denver’s assistant director of parks and recreation, told The Denver Gazette the land could be worth between half a billion dollars and $800 million.

Teal made his comments at the group’s weekly executive meeting on Tuesday.

During the open session, Thomas asked Teal if he had contacted Gilmore. Teal said he has spoken about the issue with people who make the decisions, particularly some members of the Denver City Council.

“I’m happy with the direction my discussions are going and I think the city council members I’m talking to — they’re also happy with the way these discussions are going,” he said.

The 1,000-acre park has been owned by Denver for more than a century, but is located in Douglas County, bordering Castle Pines, where the average home price exceeds $1 million. A road through the park has been paid for and is maintained by Douglas County.

Daniels Park is one of 22 parks in the Denver Mountain Parks system located outside the city limits. It is popular with hikers, used for Aboriginal ceremonies, and a bison herd roams the property.

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Park County commissioner candidates talk economy and housing https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/park-county-commissioner-candidates-talk-economy-and-housing/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 22:13:19 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/park-county-commissioner-candidates-talk-economy-and-housing/ Candidates for Park County Commissioner in the upcoming election attended a public forum to share their experiences and opinions on how to handle the challenges facing the county. The Cody Club hosted an open forum for Park County Commissioner candidates on Monday, June 20 at the Holiday Inn in Cody. Each candidate was asked to […]]]>

Candidates for Park County Commissioner in the upcoming election attended a public forum to share their experiences and opinions on how to handle the challenges facing the county.

The Cody Club hosted an open forum for Park County Commissioner candidates on Monday, June 20 at the Holiday Inn in Cody. Each candidate was asked to make a three-minute introduction followed by a question and answer period.

Six candidates “attended” the forum: Dossie Overfield, Llyod Thiel, Ken Montgomery, Matthew Scott and Park County Sheriff Scott Steward. All of the candidates attended the forum lunch in person, except for Angie Johnson, who submitted her information remotely.

Meeteetse Town Clerk Treasurer Angie Johnson sent in her biography, which was read by Country County Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Tina Hoebelheinrich. Johnson highlighted her extensive civic experience in Meeteetse – she has been employed by the town of Meeteetse in numerous capacities since 2000.

Dossie Overfield, county commissioner since 2018, said planning and zoning has been his biggest priority since taking office. After the current Park County Land Use Plan is completed, she hopes to continue revising outdated rules and regulations to modernize county processes.

Lloyd Thiel, also elected in 2018, said he is working to make Park County a great place for his three grandchildren to grow up. Public works are Thiel’s forte. He works to make sure he saves county money in these areas where and how he can.

Both Overfield and Thiel have expressed their desire to see the Park County land use plan through to completion in 2023.

Matthew Scott spoke about the long legacy of both sides of his family as educators in Park County, where he was born and raised. He holds degrees in business and finance and owns Scott Construction in Cody.

Ken Montgomery is a new resident of Park County, but he was “born Wyomingite” and has “convincing converts.” His concern is that businesses in the county cannot reach their full potential due to hiring issues, and the county needs to do more to attract families and “young people” to live here. Where these young people and families will live was a concern over lunch.

Sheriff Steward explained how 31 years in the Park County Sheriff‘s Office gave him an understanding of how every other agency in the county works. He also mentioned that the sheriff’s office employs one-third of all Park County employees.

There was only time for two questions, but they covered the most critical issues facing Park County: economic development, housing, and jobs.

Wyoming House Representative Sandy Newsome posed the first question: “What is the county’s role in economic development?” »

Thiel’s answer was simple – “the government stays away”. The government should not get in the way with regulations, nor help with irresponsible subsidies.

Scott said it was a balancing act. The county must encourage and support business owners, but do so responsibly.

Montgomery echoed Thiel’s sentiments about staying away, but stressed the importance of laying the groundwork, saying “either private property rights matter or they don’t.”

Overfield discussed the letters of support commissioners regularly receive for various projects. For her, logistics – especially the use of water and resources – determine her response as commissioner.

Steward had a more practical idea. He thinks taxpayers’ money can be well spent sending commissioners to national conferences to attract new businesses to Park County to increase county revenue.

The next question came from House Executive Director Hoebelheinrich regarding affordable housing as a solution to many challenges in Park County.

Steward said the issue was vitally important, citing his struggle to hire staff due to the rising price of housing in Cody and Powell. He added that “enforcement will be a struggle in five years” for this reason people cannot afford the prices in the area – especially house prices.

Overfield said municipalities in the county don’t have a lot of infrastructure to work with, which makes it difficult to hire staff. She also mentioned how AirBnBs (mostly owned by people out of state) are taking potential affordable housing off the market. In one case, seven out of ten houses in a block are AirBnBs and are only occupied during different times of the year.

This is the paradox of Park County’s current situation. City officials and leaders want to attract young talent and new families to the area, but no one knows how to find them housing or adequate compensation.

Montgomery said the issue is as much about wages as housing. He cited his view that the City of Cody’s recent decision to approve raises for senior officials is part of the issue impacting the county’s economic disparities. These increases for elected officials did not include salary increases for lower-level or entry-level employees.

From Scott’s perspective, this is a “bottleneck”: an ever-higher demand for employees, but an ever-lower supply of people for those jobs. He suggests encouraging Northwest College to open a trade school to create a local pool of skilled trades workers.

Northwest College already offers programs in aeronautics, agricultureand welding – to name a few.

Thiel stressed that this is not just a local problem. Economic conditions affecting Park County are similar to Billings, Jackson, and Bozeman (and nationwide). Again, he said the answer should come from the private sector and the county should make it easier for private companies to come up with their own solutions.

*This story was written by Andrew Rossi with contributions from Caleb Nelson

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Pasco Republicans to choose county commissioner nominees in August primary https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/pasco-republicans-to-choose-county-commissioner-nominees-in-august-primary/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 17:15:46 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/pasco-republicans-to-choose-county-commissioner-nominees-in-august-primary/ NEW PORT RICHEY — Pasco County Republicans will make picks in two county commission races in the Aug. 23 primary. Then, in November, all Pasco voters will choose between Republican primary winners and one write-in candidate in each race. With qualifying closing Friday, three Republicans were seeking the District 2 Pasco commission seat that incumbent […]]]>

NEW PORT RICHEY — Pasco County Republicans will make picks in two county commission races in the Aug. 23 primary. Then, in November, all Pasco voters will choose between Republican primary winners and one write-in candidate in each race.

With qualifying closing Friday, three Republicans were seeking the District 2 Pasco commission seat that incumbent Mike Moore decided to vacate. These candidates are Troy Stevenson, Seth Weightman and Christie Zimmer.

In District 4, Christina Fitzpatrick will be seeking re-election. She will face former challenger Gary Bradford and political newcomer Shannon Wittwer.

Had no other candidates entered those races, the primary election would be open to voters of all parties, but in recent weeks one write-in candidate has joined each race – Louie Rodriguez in District 2 and Cory Patterson in District 4. This closes the primary. election to Republicans only.

Weightman was endorsed by Moore and several other leading Republicans in the District 2 race. His uncle is Thomas Weightman, who served as Pasco School Superintendent, and his aunt is Jean Larkin Weightman, who served as a board member. school in Pasco. A municipal services manager for waste haulage company Republic Services, he serves on several public boards, including the Southwest Florida Water Management District.

Stevenson has been a resident of Pasco County for 20 years and owns Acme on the Go, a fleet of e-mail message trucks. Stevenson has served on the board of the Wesley Chapel Rotary Club and the North Tampa Chamber of Commerce. He is also a first responder for the National Disaster Medical Services and has worked with numerous charities including Big Brothers & Big Sisters and the Lions Club.

Zimmer is the daughter of Bonnie Zimmer, who served on both the Pasco County Commission and the Pasco School Board. She was chair and member of the Citizens’ Advisory Committee of the Metropolitan Planning Organization. A past president of the East Pasco Realtors Association and the Central Pasco Realtors Association, her website touts her interest in being a pillar of homeowners’ property rights.

In District 4, Fitzpatrick, the incumbent, is principal and administrator of Miracles Schools, a Pasco school for students with special needs. Fitzpatrick holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of South Florida, has resided in the area for 30 years, and has been involved with numerous community service organizations over the years. She cites her work as a commissioner to help create new jobs and support the Ridge Road extension.

Bradford is a retired police officer from Tampa. He runs the Bradford Group, a government relations firm that advocates for first responders. In Tallahassee, he also served on the lobbying team for the Florida Police Benevolent Association. He and his wife, Deborah, have lived in Land O’ Lakes for over 20 years. Its platform includes support for public safety initiatives and county smart growth.

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Wittwer joined the race after being part of the community movement to stop an apartment complex on Tanglewood Drive in Ridge Road that the County Commission approved. A resident of Pasco for seven years, she runs a building remediation business and has been focused on a platform of returning the commission to representative government so that all residents can be heard.

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Candidates for County Commissioner of Comanche District 3 (Republican) https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/candidates-for-county-commissioner-of-comanche-district-3-republican/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 23:26:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/candidates-for-county-commissioner-of-comanche-district-3-republican/ LAWTON, Okla. (KSWO) – With the statewide primary election fast approaching, we continue to bring you coverage of our local races. There are two candidates vying for the seat of Comanche County Commissioner in District 3. Current commissioner Alvin Cargill takes on newcomer Josh Powers. Cargill has been a commissioner for three years and has […]]]>

LAWTON, Okla. (KSWO) – With the statewide primary election fast approaching, we continue to bring you coverage of our local races.

There are two candidates vying for the seat of Comanche County Commissioner in District 3.

Current commissioner Alvin Cargill takes on newcomer Josh Powers.

Cargill has been a commissioner for three years and has lived his entire life in Comanche County, graduating from Cache High School where he eventually married and raised his family.

Opponent Josh Powers was also born and raised in Comanche County and graduated from Eisenhower High School and attended Cameron University. After graduating from college, he was hired with the Lawton Police Department for 11 years. He then went into real estate and now owns the Ares State Armory.

They both have experience in various fields, which makes them feel like the right person for the job.

“I have experience in several areas as a small business owner in real estate, I was a member of the board of the volunteer fire department. I’m the current president of Comanche County rural water 5, I’ve been involved and I know the stress they have,” Powers said.

“My experience, my experience through my construction, my civil construction business, my road building provides a great asset experience of over 30 years,” Cargill said.

Cargill, who has been in the job for a few years, tells us what he knows to be Comanche County’s biggest concerns.

“Some big concerns are one is that we need to look and try to find a more sustainable and better income for the local volunteer firefighters to make sure they continue to operate as they should and the cost of running keeps going up,” Cargill says.

Since Powers is not in office, he says all he knows is what the citizens told him when he was knocking on doors.

“Without good public safety, you can’t have a community that feels safe and wants to move around our area. This can also lead to economic development. I’m a big proponent of economic development, I think if we don’t bring big, well-paying jobs to Comanche County, we’re going to keep shrinking, we need to do the complete opposite of that, so more money from taxpayers means more money for roads,” Powers said.

The two candidates have different plans on what they want to tackle first if elected.

“Transparency I don’t think the current county government in the western district is transparent enough with their plans, with the taxpayers dollar we don’t know where our money is being spent unless we see the vehicles and trucks running actually… I believe it’s a big deal that people want to know where their money is going, all we are as commissioners is a steward of people’s money, we owe it to people to let them know where their money is is spent,” Powers said

“Push and finish the AARPA plan which is $23.5 million the county got from the federal government so finish the plan and push it, make sure everything is in place, all the plans are in place and the procedures to ensure we remain in compliance with all federal government rules being pushed back are considering additional funding for rural fires and how we can get more money for industrial development,” Cargill said.

Both candidates would like to thank those who supported them.

Cargill says he has enjoyed the past 3 years, it has been a fun learning experience for him and Powers would like the community to know that he still has and will always have an open door policy for anyone who wants to talk to him.

Election day will be June 28 and early voting will begin on June 23.

Copyright 2022 KSWO. All rights reserved.

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Latimer County Executive appoints Karin Hablow Westchester County Finance Commissioner https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/latimer-county-executive-appoints-karin-hablow-westchester-county-finance-commissioner/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 14:40:11 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/latimer-county-executive-appoints-karin-hablow-westchester-county-finance-commissioner/ Karin Hablow Westchester County Executive George Latimer has appointed Karin E. Hablow as Commissioner of Finance. Hablow previously served as Orange County Finance Commissioner in Goshen. Latimer said, “Karin has had a long and highly accomplished career managing the financial operations and accounting of significant organizations, including most recently as Orange County Commissioner of Finance. […]]]>
Karin Hablow

Westchester County Executive George Latimer has appointed Karin E. Hablow as Commissioner of Finance. Hablow previously served as Orange County Finance Commissioner in Goshen.

Latimer said, “Karin has had a long and highly accomplished career managing the financial operations and accounting of significant organizations, including most recently as Orange County Commissioner of Finance. With over 15 years of progressive experience in budgeting, tax operations and financial reporting, we are confident that she will serve the Department of Finance well in her new role as Commissioner.

Hablow said, “I am grateful to the Latimer County Executive for this great opportunity to serve the residents of Westchester in such an important role. I am thrilled to lead the Department of Finance’s team of talented tax professionals as we deliver innovative and effective government financial services.

Hablow earned his MBA from New York University’s Stern School of Business. As Finance Commissioner at Orange, Hablow managed an $830 million budget, including payroll, accounting, tax, property and taxation, debt issuance/management, debt management plan, investment and investment functions for Orange County.

Westchester County is rated AA by all three bond rating agencies – Standard and Poor’s, Fitch and Moody’s. The Westchester County Department of Finance is responsible for accounts payable, purchasing, employee payroll, debt management, pension administration, income investment, tax collection, processing certiorari tax judgments and Westchester County government benefits functions.

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