Agricultural commissioner – Gonzales For Commissioner http://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 21:24:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-13.png Agricultural commissioner – Gonzales For Commissioner http://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/ 32 32 Agriculture Commissioner Hugh Weathers seeking final term | https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/agriculture-commissioner-hugh-weathers-seeking-final-term/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 20:12:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/agriculture-commissioner-hugh-weathers-seeking-final-term/ South Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Hugh E. Weathers speaks at the 2020 Greater Florence Chamber of Commerce Outlook Luncheon. MATTHEW CHRISTIAN/MORNING NEWS COLOMBIA, SC — South Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Hugh Weathers will seek a final term. Weathers, South Carolina’s commissioner of agriculture since September 2004, announced Thursday that he would seek a final term. “I have […]]]>





South Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Hugh E. Weathers speaks at the 2020 Greater Florence Chamber of Commerce Outlook Luncheon.


MATTHEW CHRISTIAN/MORNING NEWS


COLOMBIA, SC — South Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Hugh Weathers will seek a final term.

Weathers, South Carolina’s commissioner of agriculture since September 2004, announced Thursday that he would seek a final term.

“I have had the honor and privilege of serving our hardworking farmers and citizens of South Carolina for nearly two decades,” Weathers said. “I’m incredibly proud of the progress we’ve made, but there’s still a lot of work to do. Blanche and I are incredibly humbled by the overwhelming support from local farmers and the agri-food community. »

Weathers said if re-elected, he would remain focused on the future of agriculture in South Carolina for generations to come by growing and growing local farms, providing market-based opportunities in carbon sequestration and working to combat the difficult effects of COVID-19. had on the farming community.

He was appointed acting commissioner for agriculture in September 2004, appointed permanently in 2005 and re-elected in 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018.

Weathers is a fourth-generation Bowman farmer. He was graduated magna sperm praise from the University of South Carolina in 1978, earning degrees in accounting and finance.

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Three Republicans vying for agriculture commissioner – Corridor News https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/three-republicans-vying-for-agriculture-commissioner-corridor-news/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 22:03:57 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/three-republicans-vying-for-agriculture-commissioner-corridor-news/ Through Bethany blankley | The central square TThree Republicans are running for Texas agriculture commissioner, all claiming to be conservatives. One is the outgoing commissioner, another is the Black Voices adviser for Trump and the third is a rancher with first-hand knowledge of agricultural policies and a political newcomer. The incumbent Commissioner Sid Miller is […]]]>

Through Bethany blankley | The central square

TThree Republicans are running for Texas agriculture commissioner, all claiming to be conservatives.

One is the outgoing commissioner, another is the Black Voices adviser for Trump and the third is a rancher with first-hand knowledge of agricultural policies and a political newcomer.

The incumbent Commissioner Sid Miller is running for re-election after being first elected in 2014. A former state representative, Miller served in the Texas legislature from 2003 to 2013.

One of his challengers, State Representative James White, R-Hillister, sits in the State House after being first elected in 2010.

Carey Counsil, a fifth generation rancher, owner of a local Brenham business, real estate developer, professor of economics at Blinn College and newcomer to politics is the third candidate.

The Texas Agriculture Commissioner, who heads the state’s Department of Agriculture, is responsible for promoting agricultural production, protecting consumers, stimulating economic development, and overseeing rural health programs and school meals, among other tasks.

Miller, perhaps the most controversial, has been a thorn in the side of Republican leaders, criticizing them for failing to embrace the majority of the conservative policies promoted by the Texas Republican Party delegation and for advancing policies they he called it unconstitutional.

In March, Miller was among several Texans who sued Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and the Texas Senate over a mandatory COVID-19 testing requirement. He argued that the mandate was unconstitutional and in conflict with policies implemented by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott, who at the time had just relinquished the statewide mask mandate and declared Texas “100% open”.

Miller also joined another lawsuit against Abbott, after the governor single-handedly changed election law, a power vested only in the legislature, by extending the early voting period to November 2020. Before the election, the Harris County Democrats have implemented a drive-thru. voting system, and those who sued it have alleged an increase in voter fraud due to extended early voting.

A fierce critic of the governor, Miller wrote an open letter to Abbott last fall about his current lockdown policies. He wrote: “It’s time to STOP THE MADNESS… There is simply no logic in continuing to crush the freedoms of the free people of Texas in the name of fear and politics.

White cites his own “experience with agricultural issues and his commitment to integrity and ethics” as one of the reasons he comes forward. A new member of the Texas Freedom Caucus, several of his caucus colleagues supported him, as did House Speaker Dade Phelan R-Beaumont.

White is among 25 state lawmakers who have called for a special fourth legislative session after Abbott and lawmakers failed to address employer mandates on vaccines.

A military veteran, White was a member of the Black Voices for Trump advisory board, is a proponent of tighter border security, lower taxes and bureaucratic red tape. As chair of the House Homeland Security and Public Safety Committee, White was instrumental in enacting unlicensed transportation legislation earlier this year.

In a recent interview with Brenham’s KWHI 1280 AM radio station, the Council explained why it is coming forward: to close the wage and profit gap from producer to distributor to consumer, secure water rights and other agricultural issues affecting all Texans.

He said, “I see a huge disparity between the consumer and the producer, and we need to correct that disparity. There is a huge disparity – what you see in grocery stores and… what farmers actually get. “

Farmers are paid much less than what consumers pay, he said. Grocery stores are raising prices that do not reflect the true value of the products they have purchased, hurting consumers and farmers in Texas, he added.

Another disparity that has not been resolved for years in Texas is the issue of water rights.

The council argues that “the government wants to extract water above the ground, and it is also interested in the groundwater rights of different states, and some states succumb to water rights. I just don’t see that water rights are anyone’s business other than the landowner, so it’s something I want to get out and protect.

The council said it wanted to be a link between Austin and the landowners, and “the mouthpiece for the common man and the common man.”

Appealing to all Texans as a political outsider, he said, “I am a supporter of the agricultural industry. I don’t have a lot of political experience, but I think the average person has had enough of the typical politician.

The nomination period for the 2020 election ends on December 13. The primary election is scheduled for March 1, 2022.


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Three Republicans vying for the post of agriculture commissioner | Texas https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/three-republicans-vying-for-the-post-of-agriculture-commissioner-texas-2/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 11:27:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/three-republicans-vying-for-the-post-of-agriculture-commissioner-texas-2/ (The Center Square) – Three Republicans are running for Texas agriculture commissioner, all claiming to be Conservatives. One is the incumbent commissioner, another is Black Voices adviser to Trump and the third is a rancher with first-hand knowledge of agricultural policies and a political newcomer. The incumbent Commissioner Sid Miller is running for re-election after […]]]>

(The Center Square) – Three Republicans are running for Texas agriculture commissioner, all claiming to be Conservatives.

One is the incumbent commissioner, another is Black Voices adviser to Trump and the third is a rancher with first-hand knowledge of agricultural policies and a political newcomer.

The incumbent Commissioner Sid Miller is running for re-election after being first elected in 2014. A former state representative, Miller served in the Texas legislature from 2003 to 2013.

One of his challengers, State Representative James White, R-Hillister, sits in the State House after being first elected in 2010.

Carey Counsil, a fifth-generation rancher, owner of a local Brenham business, real estate developer, professor of economics at Blinn College and new to politics, is the third candidate.

The Texas Agriculture Commissioner, who heads the state’s Department of Agriculture, is responsible for promoting agricultural production, protecting consumers, stimulating economic development, and overseeing rural health programs and school meals, among other tasks.

Miller, perhaps the most controversial, has been a thorn in the side of Republican leaders, criticizing them for failing to embrace the majority of the conservative policies promoted by the Texas Republican Party delegation and for advancing policies they he called it unconstitutional.

In March, Miller was among several Texans who sued Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and the Texas Senate over a mandatory COVID-19 testing requirement. He argued that the mandate was unconstitutional and in conflict with policies implemented by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott, who at the time had just relinquished the statewide mask mandate and declared Texas “100% open”.

Miller also joined another lawsuit against Abbott, after the governor single-handedly changed election law, a power vested only in the legislature, by extending the early voting period to November 2020. Before the election, the Harris County Democrats have implemented a drive-thru. voting system, and those who sued it have alleged an increase in voter fraud due to extended early voting.

A fierce critic of the governor, Miller wrote an open letter to Abbott last fall about his current lockdown policies. He wrote: “It’s time to STOP THE MADNESS… There is simply no logic in continuing to crush the freedoms of the free people of Texas in the name of fear and politics.

White cites his own “experience with agricultural issues and his commitment to integrity and ethics” as one of the reasons he comes forward. A new member of the Texas Freedom Caucus, several of his caucus colleagues supported him, as did House Speaker Dade Phelan R-Beaumont.

White is among 25 state lawmakers who have called for a special fourth legislative session after Abbott and lawmakers failed to address employer mandates on vaccines.

A military veteran, White was a member of the Black Voices for Trump advisory board, is a proponent of tighter border security, lower taxes and bureaucratic red tape. As chair of the House Homeland Security and Public Safety Committee, White was instrumental in enacting unlicensed transportation legislation earlier this year.

In a recent interview with Brenham’s KWHI 1280 AM radio station, the Council explained why it is coming forward: to close the wage and profit gap from producer to distributor to consumer, secure water rights and other agricultural issues affecting all Texans.

He said, “I see a huge disparity between the consumer and the producer, and we need to correct that disparity. There is a huge disparity – what you see in grocery stores and… what farmers actually get. “

Farmers are paid much less than what consumers pay, he said. Grocery stores are raising prices that do not reflect the true value of the products they have purchased, hurting consumers and farmers in Texas, he added.

Another disparity that has not been resolved for years in Texas is the issue of water rights.

The council argues that “the government wants to extract water above the ground, and it is also interested in the groundwater rights of different states, and some states succumb to water rights. I just don’t see that water rights are anyone’s business other than the landowner, so it’s something I want to defend and protect.

The council said it wanted to be a link between Austin and the landowners, and “the mouthpiece for the common man and the common man.”

Appealing to all Texans as a political outsider, he said, “I am a supporter of the agricultural industry. I don’t have a lot of political experience, but I think the average person has had enough of the typical politician.

The nomination period for the 2020 election ends on December 13. The primary election is scheduled for March 1, 2022.


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Three Republicans vying for the post of agriculture commissioner | Texas https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/three-republicans-vying-for-the-post-of-agriculture-commissioner-texas/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 11:27:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/three-republicans-vying-for-the-post-of-agriculture-commissioner-texas/ (The Center Square) – Three Republicans are running for Texas agriculture commissioner, all claiming to be Conservatives. One is the incumbent commissioner, another is Black Voices adviser to Trump and the third is a rancher with first-hand knowledge of agricultural policies and a political newcomer. The incumbent Commissioner Sid Miller is running for re-election after […]]]>

(The Center Square) – Three Republicans are running for Texas agriculture commissioner, all claiming to be Conservatives.

One is the incumbent commissioner, another is Black Voices adviser to Trump and the third is a rancher with first-hand knowledge of agricultural policies and a political newcomer.

The incumbent Commissioner Sid Miller is running for re-election after being first elected in 2014. A former state representative, Miller served in the Texas legislature from 2003 to 2013.

One of his challengers, State Representative James White, R-Hillister, sits in the State House after being first elected in 2010.

Carey Counsil, a fifth-generation rancher, owner of a local Brenham business, real estate developer, professor of economics at Blinn College and new to politics, is the third candidate.

The Texas Agriculture Commissioner, who heads the state’s Department of Agriculture, is responsible for promoting agricultural production, protecting consumers, stimulating economic development, and overseeing rural health programs and school meals, among other tasks.

Miller, perhaps the most controversial, has been a thorn in the side of Republican leaders, criticizing them for failing to embrace the majority of the conservative policies promoted by the Texas Republican Party delegation and for advancing policies they he called it unconstitutional.

In March, Miller was among several Texans who sued Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and the Texas Senate over a mandatory COVID-19 testing requirement. He argued that the mandate was unconstitutional and in conflict with policies implemented by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott, who at the time had just relinquished the statewide mask mandate and declared Texas “100% open”.

Miller also joined another lawsuit against Abbott, after the governor single-handedly changed election law, a power vested only in the legislature, by extending the early voting period to November 2020. Before the election, the Harris County Democrats have implemented a drive-thru. voting system, and those who sued it have alleged an increase in voter fraud due to extended early voting.

A fierce critic of the governor, Miller wrote an open letter to Abbott last fall about his current lockdown policies. He wrote: “It’s time to STOP THE MADNESS… There is simply no logic in continuing to crush the freedoms of the free people of Texas in the name of fear and politics.

White cites his own “experience with agricultural issues and his commitment to integrity and ethics” as one of the reasons he comes forward. A new member of the Texas Freedom Caucus, several of his caucus colleagues supported him, as did House Speaker Dade Phelan R-Beaumont.

White is among 25 state lawmakers who have called for a special fourth legislative session after Abbott and lawmakers failed to address employer mandates on vaccines.

A military veteran, White was a member of the Black Voices for Trump advisory board, is a proponent of tighter border security, lower taxes and bureaucratic red tape. As chair of the House Homeland Security and Public Safety Committee, White was instrumental in enacting unlicensed transportation legislation earlier this year.

In a recent interview with Brenham’s KWHI 1280 AM radio station, the Council explained why it is coming forward: to close the wage and profit gap from producer to distributor to consumer, secure water rights and other agricultural issues affecting all Texans.

He said, “I see a huge disparity between the consumer and the producer, and we need to correct that disparity. There is a huge disparity – what you see in grocery stores and… what farmers actually get. “

Farmers are paid much less than what consumers pay, he said. Grocery stores are raising prices that do not reflect the true value of the products they have purchased, hurting consumers and farmers in Texas, he added.

Another disparity that has not been resolved for years in Texas is the issue of water rights.

The council argues that “the government wants to extract water above the ground, and it is also interested in the groundwater rights of different states, and some states succumb to water rights. I just don’t see that water rights are anyone’s business other than the landowner, so it’s something I want to defend and protect.

The council said it wanted to be a link between Austin and the landowners, and “the mouthpiece for the common man and the common man.”

Appealing to all Texans as a political outsider, he said, “I am a supporter of the agricultural industry. I don’t have a lot of political experience, but I think the average person has had enough of the typical politician.

The nomination period for the 2020 election ends on December 13. The primary election is scheduled for March 1, 2022.

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Florida Agricultural Commissioner Nikki Fried asks President Joe Biden to postpone COVID-19 treatment reduction https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/florida-agricultural-commissioner-nikki-fried-asks-president-joe-biden-to-postpone-covid-19-treatment-reduction/ https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/florida-agricultural-commissioner-nikki-fried-asks-president-joe-biden-to-postpone-covid-19-treatment-reduction/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 23:45:30 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/florida-agricultural-commissioner-nikki-fried-asks-president-joe-biden-to-postpone-covid-19-treatment-reduction/ Tallahassee (CBSMiami / NSF) The day after Gov. Ron DeSantis pledged to maintain a supply of monoclonal antibody treatments for those infected with COVID-19 in Florida, Agriculture Commissioner Nicky Fried gave President Joe Byden a change in policies. processing missions in Florida. I asked that it be postponed. Fried, who is seeking nomination for Democratic […]]]>

Tallahassee (CBSMiami / NSF)

The day after Gov. Ron DeSantis pledged to maintain a supply of monoclonal antibody treatments for those infected with COVID-19 in Florida, Agriculture Commissioner Nicky Fried gave President Joe Byden a change in policies. processing missions in Florida. I asked that it be postponed.

Fried, who is seeking nomination for Democratic governor in 2022, called for a postponement of plans for national distribution of antibody-based drugs until the number of COVID-19 cases in Florida “continues to decline “.

“Federal health officials have set Florida’s treatment dose allocation at 30,950, but because the state has significantly delayed implementation of this treatment, more residents than available doses have this therapy. I’m afraid I need to take advantage of it, ”wrote a Democrat, who has been elected across the state of Florida, to the White House on Friday.

“I understand the annoyance that this treatment is unfairly distributed to only a handful of states, but states recently extended their timeline before changing their current dose distribution. Give time to further reduce cases of COVID-19. Culminate. “

A few states, including Florida, have acquired most of the monoclonal antibody therapies available so far, according to White House officials. However, the US Department of Health and Human Services has allocated weekly distributions “based on new COVID-19 cases and weekly hospitalization reports, in addition to inventory and usage data” submitted by state to the federal government. , a government official said this week.

According to federal health officials, the state of Florida this week has a limit of 2,100 treatments developed by Regeneron, a monoclonal antibody therapy, and Eli Lilly, a pharmaceutical company.

Florida’s treatment allowance has the largest share of all states.

Desantis, who regularly warns the Biden administration about the COVID-19 mitigation strategy, said Thursday the federal government had “tampered” with states receiving drugs announced by the governor as effective early treatment for fight the virus. Says that. He promised, “We will fight like hell to make sure we get what we need.”

Biden’s plans to fight COVID-19 partially promised to increase the average weekly rate of monoclonal antibody therapy shipments by an additional 50% in September.

Fried’s letter to the White House on Friday also swept aside his political rivals, declaring that Floridian was “a victim of mismanagement and misinformation in the Desantis administration pandemic.”

According to the Florida Department of Health, 51,240 Floridians have died from COVID-19 since the virus outbreak last year.

Florida Agricultural Commissioner Nikki Fried asks President Joe Biden to postpone COVID-19 treatment reduction

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New Marin County Agriculture Commissioner Stefan Parnay aims to better balance consumer price scales https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/new-marin-county-agriculture-commissioner-stefan-parnay-aims-to-better-balance-consumer-price-scales/ https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/new-marin-county-agriculture-commissioner-stefan-parnay-aims-to-better-balance-consumer-price-scales/#respond Wed, 25 Aug 2021 16:34:22 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/new-marin-county-agriculture-commissioner-stefan-parnay-aims-to-better-balance-consumer-price-scales/ Stefan Parnay didn’t like weeds when he was little. Now an adult, he has power over them, as the agricultural commissioner of Marin County. The Sonoma County native grew up on the outskirts of Sevastopol where his father – a school official and avid gardener himself – taught Parnay, 56, the treasures of growing Earth’s […]]]>

Stefan Parnay didn’t like weeds when he was little. Now an adult, he has power over them, as the agricultural commissioner of Marin County.

The Sonoma County native grew up on the outskirts of Sevastopol where his father – a school official and avid gardener himself – taught Parnay, 56, the treasures of growing Earth’s plants. Now in Windsor, he grows peppers and green vegetables in his own garden.

“He was pretty much the green thumb. I pulled some weeds, although it wasn’t as exciting as other things, ”he said.

But despite his distaste for weeding, getting into farming as a profession still appealed to Parnay.

After graduating in ornamental horticulture from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Parnay worked in 1994 in the Sonoma County Department of Agriculture, Weights and Measures, where he worked for 16 years. He cut his teeth as a Senior Agricultural Program Assistant, and was promoted in 2004 to the rank of Deputy Chief Agriculture Commissioner.

In 2010, Parnay became Assistant Commissioner of Agriculture for Marin County. In 2020, he replaced longtime commissioner Stacy Carlsen, who retired after 25 years of service.

In his new role, Parnay faces a variety of issues, including the impacts of drought and climate change. But the most controversial in his region centers on raising cattle at Point Reyes National Seashore. The park has allowed the practice for decades, drawing fierce criticism from environmentalists.

“Livestock and agriculture have been around for hundreds of years,” he said in his support for the practice. “Cattle ranching represents 20% of our agriculture in Marin County. It is important. If there was no breeding, it would be devastating.

Animal production, which includes raising livestock and dairy products, brings in more than $ 20 million a year, the county’s crop report says.

Meanwhile, North Bay farmers face more regulations, drought issues, and learning ways to become more sustainable.

“It has become more and more difficult,” he said. “But it’s great to see most people’s acceptance. “

Eliminate price inequalities

Parnay has goals for his new job. He plans to put more authority and oversight into the responsibilities of the Weights and Measures division.

Weights and Measures is responsible for performing inspections related to consumer protection and handling complaints of unfair practices, up to the price a buyer pays for groceries at the store.

California’s Measurement Standards Division reported in 2019 that out of 1,891 items purchased in state testing, 423 transactions were overcharged at 223 stores. Many of the undercover transactions involved buyers from low-income or disadvantaged backgrounds.

Beyond the “test” inspections, the department will also carry out reviews of price analyzes in stores. In the latest report, 245 out of 4,236 scans were overcharges, many of which involved buyers from disadvantaged households.

Reasons may include a language barrier, ignorance of a system in place to deal with these types of complaints, or a general reluctance to escalate issues.

“I think there may be a lack of knowledge of their rights,” Parnay said.

When it comes to weeds, which is on her county division wishlist, Parnay would also like to start an invasive weed control program that pairs resources like the UC Cooperative Extension with farmers trying to rid their soil of plants which take over. He listed the purple star thistle as a particular problem in the county.

“Weeding work needs to be done,” he said.

Susan Wood covers law, cannabis, manufacturing, biotechnology, energy, transportation, agriculture, and banking and finance. For 25 years, Susan worked for various publications, including the North County Times, now part of the Union Tribune in San Diego County, as well as the Tahoe Daily Tribune and Lake Tahoe News. She graduated from Fullerton College. Contact her at 530-545-8662 or susan.wood@busjrnl.com


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Ventura County Government: County Agricultural Commissioner Crops and Livestock Report 2020 Highlights Various Women’s Stories https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/ventura-county-government-county-agricultural-commissioner-crops-and-livestock-report-2020-highlights-various-womens-stories/ https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/ventura-county-government-county-agricultural-commissioner-crops-and-livestock-report-2020-highlights-various-womens-stories/#respond Mon, 02 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/ventura-county-government-county-agricultural-commissioner-crops-and-livestock-report-2020-highlights-various-womens-stories/ July 29, 2021 Ventura, California – The year 2020 has highlighted several elements regarding the importance of agriculture to Ventura County. The COVID 19 pandemic has underscored how vulnerable and extraordinarily essential the 40,000 hardworking people who faithfully continued to come to work are not only the residents of Ventura, but people around the world. […]]]>

July 29, 2021

Ventura, California – The year 2020 has highlighted several elements regarding the importance of agriculture to Ventura County. The COVID 19 pandemic has underscored how vulnerable and extraordinarily essential the 40,000 hardworking people who faithfully continued to come to work are not only the residents of Ventura, but people around the world. They have kept food, clothing, landscaping, and farming systems in motion despite many new challenges and changes in our society. They did all of this with a concern not only about how to provide food and shelter for their families, but also to keep them safe thanks to rapidly changing working and social conditions.

Our report this year presents the diverse stories of women in agriculture in Ventura County. Women who cultivate, run a farm, connect farm laborers with resources, defend the rights of farm laborers, distribute wholesale produce, run farmer’s markets, provide agricultural education, contract farm labor , provide housing for agricultural labor, oversee food safety, provide legal advice, provide pest management advice, conduct agricultural research, and protect industry, the public and the environment by regulating ‘Agriculture.

With restaurant closings and grocery store restrictions in 2020, the farming community and distributors have had to scramble to change marketing practices and for some the type of products they grow. Some of these changes are reflected in crop values ​​and production figures.

Strawberries are still number one

The estimated gross value of agriculture in Ventura County for the 2020 calendar year is $ 1,985,365,000. This represents a decrease of 0.2% from 2019. Strawberries were again the number one crop with $ 575,373,000, up 13.0%. Lemons came back in second place with a value of $ 216,190,000, an increase of 2.0%. Nursery stock dropped to third place with a value of $ 193,135,000, up 3.0%. Tomatoes remained in seventh place with a value of $ 54,387,000, up 17.0%. Peppers moved up to eighth place with a value of $ 41,165,000, but was down 4.0%.

Big changes in the top ten

Lawyers moved to fourth place with a value of $ 179,727,000, up 54.0%. Raspberries dropped to fifth place with a value of $ 141,547,000, down 30.0%. Celery dropped to sixth place with a value of $ 126,870,000, down 48.0%. Blueberries entered the top ten for the first time, ranking ninth at a value of $ 38,781,000, with a whopping 119.0% increase!


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Santa Barbara County Agricultural Commissioner wants seeds shipped from China | Local News https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/santa-barbara-county-agricultural-commissioner-wants-seeds-shipped-from-china-local-news/ https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/santa-barbara-county-agricultural-commissioner-wants-seeds-shipped-from-china-local-news/#respond Sat, 31 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/santa-barbara-county-agricultural-commissioner-wants-seeds-shipped-from-china-local-news/ Residents of Santa Barbara County are among those nationwide who have received “mysterious and unsolicited seeds from China,” and the county agriculture commissioner’s office wants those seed packets. Those who receive such unsolicited seed packet shipments, often labeled “jewelry,” should not open, plant or dispose of them, County Agriculture Commissioner Cathy Fisher said. She asked […]]]>

Residents of Santa Barbara County are among those nationwide who have received “mysterious and unsolicited seeds from China,” and the county agriculture commissioner’s office wants those seed packets.

Those who receive such unsolicited seed packet shipments, often labeled “jewelry,” should not open, plant or dispose of them, County Agriculture Commissioner Cathy Fisher said.

She asked residents to save unopened seed packets and contact one of the Agriculture Commissioner’s offices to have them picked up or to receive deposit instructions.

Anyone who has already planted the seeds is asked to contact one of the offices for further instructions.

Residents who have received seeds can call the Santa Maria office, located at 624 W. Foster Road, Suite E, at 805-934-6200; the Buellton office, located at 185 W. Highway 246, Suite 101, 805-688-5331; or the Santa Barbara office, located at 263 Camino del Remedio, 805-681-5600.

“Invasive species can devastate the environment, displace or destroy native plants and insects, severely damage crops and poison livestock,” Fisher said. “Taking measures to prevent their introduction is the most effective method of reducing both the risk of invasive species infestations and the cost of controlling and mitigating these infestations. “

3 Santa Barbara County Jail inmates and 20 Sheriff's Employees Falsely Tested Positive for Coronavirus

Three inmates at the Santa Barbara County Jail who previously tested positive for COVID-19 tested negative after being retested with multiple employees, according to a spokesperson for the sheriff, also found negative results. .


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Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried to hold briefing on COVID-19 as cases rise https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/florida-agriculture-commissioner-nikki-fried-to-hold-briefing-on-covid-19-as-cases-rise/ https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/florida-agriculture-commissioner-nikki-fried-to-hold-briefing-on-covid-19-as-cases-rise/#respond Wed, 28 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/florida-agriculture-commissioner-nikki-fried-to-hold-briefing-on-covid-19-as-cases-rise/ TALLAHASSEE, Florida – Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried will address the increase in coronavirus cases in the state at a press conference on Wednesday. Fried is scheduled to speak from the Florida Capitol in Tallahassee at 12:15 p.m. His remarks will be broadcast at the top of this story. According to her office, this will […]]]>

TALLAHASSEE, Florida – Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried will address the increase in coronavirus cases in the state at a press conference on Wednesday.

Fried is scheduled to speak from the Florida Capitol in Tallahassee at 12:15 p.m. His remarks will be broadcast at the top of this story. According to her office, this will be the first of the Commissioner’s regular COVID-19 briefings.

[TRENDING: DeSantis sounds off on masks in schools | ER nurse now open to COVID shot | Biles withdraws from Olympics]

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A press release reveals that Fried will discuss the Florida Department of Health and its decision to no longer provide daily COVID-19 data despite the country’s leading state in new viral infections. The FDOH has instead decided to publish weekly reports, despite calls to revert to publishing daily figures.

Fried will also discuss the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s decision to reverse its mask guidelines and recommend that vaccinated people wear face covers indoors again. The CDC has also advised all students, staff, teachers and visitors to wear masks in Florida schools. The health agency said its new recommendations come as the delta variant turns out to be a more infectious version of the coronavirus and the nation sees a larger presence.

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The commissioner’s speech comes a day after the CDC announced its updated guidance, becoming one of Florida’s top officials to publicly address change.

However, Gov. Ron DeSantis’s office released a statement saying parents should have the right to choose whether their child should be subjected to a face covering. DeSantis had previously opposed children wearing masks in classrooms.

[RELATED: What do experts say about statements from Gov. DeSantis about students wearing masks at school?]

Florida’s top Democrat, Fried, will challenge DeSantis for the governor’s seat. She announced her candidacy for Florida’s top office last month. Fried will compete for the Democratic nomination for governor against Rep. Charlie Crist.

Copyright 2021 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All rights reserved.


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The agricultural commissioner of Mass. discusses the Berkshire farm tour https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/the-agricultural-commissioner-of-mass-discusses-the-berkshire-farm-tour/ https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/the-agricultural-commissioner-of-mass-discusses-the-berkshire-farm-tour/#respond Wed, 14 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/the-agricultural-commissioner-of-mass-discusses-the-berkshire-farm-tour/ Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources Commissioner John Lebeaux made his annual visit to the Berkshires on Tuesday. Appointed by Governor Charlie Baker in 2015, Lebeaux – the grandson of a farmer – has spent years working with his father in their family nurseries in Shrewsbury and is a certified horticulturist. He was a chosen person […]]]>

Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources Commissioner John Lebeaux made his annual visit to the Berkshires on Tuesday. Appointed by Governor Charlie Baker in 2015, Lebeaux – the grandson of a farmer – has spent years working with his father in their family nurseries in Shrewsbury and is a certified horticulturist. He was a chosen person in Shrewsbury as well as a member of the Massachusetts Food and Agriculture Council, and served two terms as president of the Massachusetts Nursery and Landscape Association. WAMC spoke with Lebeaux in Stockbridge about his visit to four farms in southern Berkshire County.

LEBEAUX: Our department’s mission is to keep Massachusetts’ food supply safe and secure, and to maintain Massachusetts agriculture economically and environmentally sound. So we do this through various programs, both regulatory and promotional. We give a lot of subsidies to farmers. So we’re active, and here we are today with Berkshire Grown. We deal with the various local buying groups all over the state, and they are kind of our eyes and ears and help us navigate the individual region. And they showed us great things today.

WAMC: Then explain that to me. What did you see when you visited southern Berkshire today?

Well, today we saw that the focus was on the farms where the farmers don’t own the property. And that’s a big … You all know here and especially in the south of County Berkshire the land values ​​are so high that it is sometimes very difficult, unless it is like a family farm handed down , for new young beginner farmers to acquire land. So we met farmers who have …. A lot of times it’s just a handshake with an interested landowner who might want to support this activity. But it’s a big challenge these days, and we’ve heard from some farmers today who would like to have a little more certainty.

So from your perspective and your position, what is the best way to support farmers in this position?

Well, I mean, the easiest thing to say is that consumers do business with one of our local farmers. I don’t think you necessarily have to find those who don’t own the land. But that’s what makes the farm viable and puts money in their pocket. And in some cases they are hoping to acquire the land they are currently leasing or on which they have this agreement, or in some cases are looking for more. And frankly, sometimes a long term lease would be satisfactory, in some cases preferred. But they need that certainty because if you want to make improvements to the property, to the infrastructure, to the ground, you want to be able to take full advantage of them. So support your local farmer.

Now, at the state level, how does the Berkshire farming community fit into the overall vision for agriculture in Massachusetts?

Well, we have a huge preponderance of dairy farms here because dairy farms require a lot of land. And there are certainly many in the county of Berkshire. One of our main agricultural counties in the state is Berkshire County. I think it’s about 20% of the state’s annual farm value. We’re making, statewide, about half a billion dollars a year, a little less than that. I think it’s in the $ 90 million range, about 20%, I believe, for Berkshire. So a preponderant – I mean, we see a lot of dairy here, but a lot of product. It’s a very wide range of products that are being shipped to everything, well, not just statewide, but region-wide.

Now, are the concerns and issues you hear from farmers today in the Berkshires similar to what you hear from farmers across the state? Are they distinct from the region? How to integrate?

Well, I mean real estate values ​​in Massachusetts are expensive, but in an area where there’s competition for vacation homes, second homes, so Bristol County the same way, but the county of Berkshire is certainly a bit of a poster for that. It is therefore something unique. However, I think the second thing we heard a lot today was about the workforce, the difficulty of sometimes keeping the workforce from year to year. And that’s statewide, it’s a problem. Work is a problem. To get a good workforce, and to be able to keep them and be, you know, pay people a good living wage that makes them want to keep doing it. So it’s a huge challenge, the work.

So in your position, do you have a philosophy that you follow or a vision for agriculture in the state? How do you sort of define what you do in your role?

Well, I mean, I’m trying to follow our mission. And honestly, I think it’s a pretty good mission. And I didn’t invent the mission. I inherited the mission. So, you know, we try to regulate fairly. I mean, there are times when we have to say “no” to farmers. We try not to, but, you know, we’re very active, say, during COVID. We tried to put in place procedures, regulations that would allow the opening of farmers’ markets. I mean, that was the question. I mean, 15 months ago there were a lot of questions. And so we try to have a regulatory system that is linked to the mission. Yes, sometimes we have to tell people, you can do it, or you can’t do it. But our goal is to keep our farmers as prosperous as possible.

Is there something people don’t know about farming in Massachusetts that you wish they knew?

Well, you know, obviously we’re not one of the big square states in the Midwest. We don’t pump, you know, hundreds of millions of tonnes of corn or soybeans. But we are very good at what we do here. We have very, very innovative farmers. So what we have an advantage, our big advantage is the consumer base. You know, about 6 million people live in Massachusetts. We are one of the top 10 direct farm-to-consumer sellers in the United States. So this is the farm stand. This is the farmers market. It is the mobile market. This is the CSA. This is where Massachusetts, many Massachusetts farmers have done so well. Now, obviously, these are not cranberries. It’s not milk. But a lot of our farmers survive by retailing and not wholesaling, or a lot of retailing and not wholesaling. So I don’t know how many people know that we’re one of the top states in the country for direct farm-to-consumer sales.

What’s on your radar, looking summer through fall for agriculture in Massachusetts? Are there any big milestones or deadlines to follow as the seasons continue to advance?

Well, I mean, you know, we react a lot to the seasons. I mean, it’s a quintessential seasonal activity. Farmers had a good year last year. I mean, it’s interesting how COVID has affected different businesses. You know, people have increased their desire for locally produced food for a variety of reasons. Maybe it was safer to buy. They just didn’t want to deal with a lot of people or who drove them there and then they found a happy space there. So part of it is to retain customers who were first introduced to local farming through COVID. And we’re seeing a lot of it this year. So things are good. You know, as I mentioned, for the most part agriculture has done well thanks to COVID, Massachusetts agriculture has done well thanks to COVID. And it’s so grateful that Commonwealth residents thought this was a good place to get food, and that’s what we want them to continue to do.


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