Agricultural commissioner – Gonzales For Commissioner http://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/ Fri, 15 Jul 2022 23:03:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-13.png Agricultural commissioner – Gonzales For Commissioner http://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/ 32 32 Monterey County Agriculture Commissioner Henry Gonzales Retires – Monterey Herald https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/monterey-county-agriculture-commissioner-henry-gonzales-retires-monterey-herald/ Fri, 15 Jul 2022 23:03:45 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/monterey-county-agriculture-commissioner-henry-gonzales-retires-monterey-herald/ SALINAS — Monterey County Agriculture Commissioner Henry Gonzales will retire Dec. 30 after nearly four decades of service in the agriculture commissioner system. Gonzales began his career in Monterey County 38 years ago as a temporary insect trapper and later rose to agricultural inspector/biologist, assistant commissioner of agriculture, and chief assistant commissioner of agriculture. In […]]]>

SALINAS — Monterey County Agriculture Commissioner Henry Gonzales will retire Dec. 30 after nearly four decades of service in the agriculture commissioner system.

Gonzales began his career in Monterey County 38 years ago as a temporary insect trapper and later rose to agricultural inspector/biologist, assistant commissioner of agriculture, and chief assistant commissioner of agriculture.

In 2008, Gonzales left to become Ventura County Commissioner of Agriculture, then returned to Monterey County 10 years later to become commissioner.

Gonzales has deep roots in agriculture being born into a family of migrant farm workers, starting work as a farm laborer at the age of 14, thinning lettuce with the short-handled hoe called “el cortito” or ” the short” in Spanish.

As a member of the United Farm Workers, he was one of many protesters outside the Monterey County Jail in 1970 where Cesar Chavez, leader of the United Farm Workers of America, was being held for violating a court injunction against a boycott .

“I am grateful for the opportunity to transition from farmhand to agriculture commissioner,” Gonzales said in a press release. “My roots have provided me with an invaluable perspective that has played a vital role in all the work I have done as Commissioner.

Gonzales singled out successful projects in his list of accomplishments, including the first production of a Cannabis Crop Report summarizing commercial cannabis production in Monterey County, the Key Crops and Livestock Report, which is an important product of the Commissioner’s Office, being translated into Spanish for the first time to better reach agricultural workers, successfully implementing an industrial hemp pilot program, signaling for the first time the economic value industrial hemp in the annual crop report and successfully implementing the school and pesticide regulations.

“Henry Gonzalez was one of the most effective agricultural commissioners in the country,” Supervisor Luis Alejo said in the statement. “He knew how critical it was to help ensure a vibrant agricultural industry in our county, but also to protect our agricultural workforce. He set the bar for what an agricultural commissioner should be.

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit in 2020, followed by wildfires later that year, the needs of agricultural workers who were essential workers in the food production chain were paramount. Gonzales says successes during this time include creating a council for the protection of agricultural workers during COVID-19 in partnership with local elected officials and agricultural industry organizers, creating essential agricultural employee cards in Spanish to educate agricultural workers on services available at the start of the pandemic, the distribution of more than one million single-use surgical masks, more than 50,000 16.9 oz. bottles of hand sanitizer and more than 360,000 N95 respirators to help protect farm workers from the virus and wildfire smoke, and the creation of the bilingual farm worker helpline, 831 -809-2394, to receive concerns, questions and complaints directly from agricultural workers.

“Agricultural Commissioner Henry Gonzales was the right person at the right time for Monterey County,” Supervisor Chris Lopez said in the statement. “Through a pandemic, layered with wildfires and new pest challenges, he rose to the challenge and led by launching a collaboration. I will miss his leadership and will always appreciate his unwavering dedication.

Gonzales says he plans to travel and spend more time with his family, as well as seek new and interesting challenges.

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Monterey County Agriculture Commissioner Announces Retirement https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/monterey-county-agriculture-commissioner-announces-retirement/ Fri, 15 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/monterey-county-agriculture-commissioner-announces-retirement/ The Monterey County Commissioner of Agriculture announced his retirement after nearly four decades with the county. Henry Gonzales began working in Monterey County 38 years ago as a temporary insect trapper before being promoted to Agricultural Inspector/Biologist, Assistant Commissioner of Agriculture and Assistant Commissioner of Agriculture. He started the job as agriculture commissioner in 2018. […]]]>

The Monterey County Commissioner of Agriculture announced his retirement after nearly four decades with the county. Henry Gonzales began working in Monterey County 38 years ago as a temporary insect trapper before being promoted to Agricultural Inspector/Biologist, Assistant Commissioner of Agriculture and Assistant Commissioner of Agriculture. He started the job as agriculture commissioner in 2018. Gonzales, the son of migrant farmworkers, worked in the fields as a teenager and protested in Monterey County Jail in 1970 when Cesar Chavez was arrested . “Agricultural Commissioner Henry Gonzales was the right person at the right time for Monterey County,” said Monterey County Supervisor Chris Lopez. “Through a pandemic, layered with wildfires and new pest challenges, he rose to the challenge and led by launching a collaboration. I will miss his leadership and will always appreciate his unwavering dedication. Gonzales’ last day as Monterey County Agriculture Commissioner will be Dec. 30, 2022.

The Monterey County Commissioner of Agriculture announced his retirement after nearly four decades with the county.

Henry Gonzales began working in Monterey County 38 years ago as a temporary insect trapper before being promoted to agricultural inspector/biologist, assistant commissioner of agriculture, and chief assistant commissioner of agriculture.

He took office as Commissioner for Agriculture in 2018.

Gonzales, the son of migrant farm workers, worked in the fields as a teenager and protested in Monterey County Jail in 1970 when Cesar Chavez was arrested.

“Agricultural Commissioner Henry Gonzales was the right person at the right time for Monterey County,” said Monterey County Supervisor Chris Lopez. “Through a pandemic, layered with wildfires and new pest challenges, he rose to the challenge and led by launching a collaboration. I will miss his leadership and will always appreciate his unwavering dedication.

Gonzales’ last day as Monterey County Agriculture Commissioner will be December 30, 2022.

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The Commissioner of Agriculture of the Mass. will conduct an annual tour of Berkshire County farms next week https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/the-commissioner-of-agriculture-of-the-mass-will-conduct-an-annual-tour-of-berkshire-county-farms-next-week/ Thu, 14 Jul 2022 19:28:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/the-commissioner-of-agriculture-of-the-mass-will-conduct-an-annual-tour-of-berkshire-county-farms-next-week/ John Lebeaux’s visit to the state’s largely rural westernmost county is being hosted by Berkshire Grown. “Berkshire Grown is one of nine ‘buy local’ organizations in the state of Massachusetts, and our organization supports local agriculture and food in the Berkshires,” said Executive Director Margaret Moulton. Moulton says Berkshire Grown is eager to show Lebeaux […]]]>

John Lebeaux’s visit to the state’s largely rural westernmost county is being hosted by Berkshire Grown.

“Berkshire Grown is one of nine ‘buy local’ organizations in the state of Massachusetts, and our organization supports local agriculture and food in the Berkshires,” said Executive Director Margaret Moulton.

Moulton says Berkshire Grown is eager to show Lebeaux how state funding is used in the region.

“The other thing we’re trying to highlight this year is our own program, which is called Farm to Food Access, which is really focused on both supporting local farmers and getting their local food to them. in large quantities to pantries, food access sites. , community kitchens, meal programs all over the county,” she told WAMC.

The first of three farms the commissioner will visit is Holiday Brook Farm in Dalton, which participates in the Farm to Food Access program by supplying produce to Berkshire County Elder Services and the Berkshire Dream Center.

“This is a fourth generation farm currently owned by Ruth and Dicken Crane,” Moulton said. “And they contracted with farmer Kate Pike and Chelsea Vigue to really reinvigorate their vegetable farming program and also expand their CSA, Community Supported Agriculture, farm actions program. And they got money to put two new overhead tunnels that extend their growing season into early spring and late fall.

The tour continues with Robinson Farm in Becket. Moulton says David Robinson is the only black farm owner in the Berkshires he knows of.

“He’s a retired rodeo rider, and he’s ridden and competed all over the country for decades,” she said. “And he retired to his family farm that his great-grandfather bought, 160 acres, in 1906. that land and added to it. He literally reclaims that land as pasture, where he starts a herd of oxen , both herding and meat production. He does it all on his own. He’s an amazing person and he really uses his knowledge of big animals, bull management, horse management and transfers them into raising these animals. And the relationship he has with these gigantic oxen… It’s like pets.

The last stop will be at Woven Roots Farm in Tyringham.

“It’s a diverse vegetable farm that’s very, very community-involved, and they’ve been on this site, I think, for about 10 years now,” Moulton said. “It took them a very long time to find land to be able to farm as their own important land. They built a house there, they have a long-term lease on the farmland, and they have a lot of state money and other grant income for a new barn they are building that is so beautiful. It’s like a little chapel in praise of agriculture. So we’re going to see this barn project, have lunch , visit the vegetable fields and talk to them about their experience and connection to the community and what they are doing for low income families to connect them to local nutrients…dense food and the land that grows it .

Massachusetts Agriculture Commissioner John Lebeaux’s visit to the Berkshires is scheduled for Wednesday, July 20e. The visit is not open to the public. You can find WAMC’s coverage of their 2021 Berkshires tour here.

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Glenn County Agriculture Commissioner Requests Second Disaster Declaration https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/glenn-county-agriculture-commissioner-requests-second-disaster-declaration/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 17:54:40 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/glenn-county-agriculture-commissioner-requests-second-disaster-declaration/ Glenn County Agriculture Commissioner Marcie Skelton requested a disaster declaration designation for Glenn County from the Secretary of the United States Department of Agriculture earlier this month, due to the results freezing temperatures that occurred in February and April. “During the week of April 11, 2022, Glenn County experienced sustained freezing temperatures ranging from 31.6 […]]]>

Glenn County Agriculture Commissioner Marcie Skelton requested a disaster declaration designation for Glenn County from the Secretary of the United States Department of Agriculture earlier this month, due to the results freezing temperatures that occurred in February and April.

“During the week of April 11, 2022, Glenn County experienced sustained freezing temperatures ranging from 31.6 to 31.96 degrees Fahrenheit from 6 a.m. April 12 to 1 a.m. April 13,” reads a statement released by the Glenn County Board of Supervisors. “The extreme weather conditions have affected crops and significantly impacted 2022 crop yields for local growers of walnuts, olives, cherries and boysenberries.”

According to the statement, growers reported a 5-50% crop loss for walnuts (an average loss of 34% countywide), a 50-100% crop loss for olives (an average loss of 56% for table olives and a loss of 51% for olive oil). county-wide), a 90% crop loss for cherries and a 67% crop loss for boysenberries.

“Based on Glenn County 5-year average yield and price comparisons, estimated dollars lost per harvest are valued at $53,691,041 for walnuts, $18,455,403 for olives, $168,750 for cherries and $62,040 for boysenberries,” the statement read. “This equates to an estimated financial loss of $72,377,234 for producers in Glenn County.”

Skelton previously applied for a disaster declaration designation on April 13 following a frost event that occurred on February 24 and its effect on almond crops.

The impact of the February event revealed a 60% loss in overall almond production in Glenn County with an estimated financial loss of $148,709,129 for Glenn County almond growers, according to the press release, but this request was still pending at the time the information was reported.

“The two events combined have an impact of $221,086,363 on local growers,” the statement read. “Downstream impacts will also be felt by hullers, dryers, processors, millers, pesticide and fertilizer applicators, pesticide and fertilizer dealers and contractors.”

County officials said if the Secretary of the United States Department of Agriculture declares the events a local disaster, he would take advantage of potential funding opportunities to affected growers through the United States Department of Agriculture. United States, Farm Services Agency.

For more information: appeal-democrat.com

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Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried Says Food Prices Won’t Halt Meal Program – Action News Jax https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/florida-agriculture-commissioner-nikki-fried-says-food-prices-wont-halt-meal-program-action-news-jax/ Tue, 17 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/florida-agriculture-commissioner-nikki-fried-says-food-prices-wont-halt-meal-program-action-news-jax/ TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — As food prices rise amid broader inflation, state agriculture commissioner Nikki Fried said Tuesday she doesn’t expect a hiatus in programs summer nutrition in schools. The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services administers the federally funded Summer BreakSpot program, which provides free meals to children 18 and under in schools and places […]]]>

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — As food prices rise amid broader inflation, state agriculture commissioner Nikki Fried said Tuesday she doesn’t expect a hiatus in programs summer nutrition in schools.

The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services administers the federally funded Summer BreakSpot program, which provides free meals to children 18 and under in schools and places such as parks and libraries.

“Once our summer BreakSpots resume, we get the money from the USDA (US Department of Agriculture). The food programs are going to be in place,” Fried, a Democratic gubernatorial candidate, said during of a press conference in Tallahassee.

Fried acknowledged the higher-than-usual cost of food and told reporters she was in talks with the federal government about ways to mitigate costs for the agriculture industry.

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“We are also monitoring some of the underlying issues related to the rising cost of food. Thus, we are witnessing a significant increase in the cost of fertilizers. So we’ve been on the phone with the USDA, with my counterparts across the country with our agricultural (agricultural) commodity producers here in the state, to figure out how long this is taking,” Fried said.

Rising gasoline prices have also affected the cost of food production. Federal and state governments this month relaxed rules for blending fuels that include a type of ethanol, in a bid to bolster gasoline supplies.

But Fried said Tuesday his department was “looking at other options” to reduce fuel costs.

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Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Joins Governor’s Race https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/kentucky-agriculture-commissioner-joins-governors-race/ Mon, 02 May 2022 22:11:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/kentucky-agriculture-commissioner-joins-governors-race/ Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles entered the state’s 2023 gubernatorial race, seeking to cultivate his rural Republican ties into a winning formula in what is shaping up to be a very competitive for the GOP nomination to challenge Democratic Governor Andy Beshear. Quarles told a GOP rally Saturday night in Lexington that he will run […]]]>

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles entered the state’s 2023 gubernatorial race, seeking to cultivate his rural Republican ties into a winning formula in what is shaping up to be a very competitive for the GOP nomination to challenge Democratic Governor Andy Beshear. Quarles told a GOP rally Saturday night in Lexington that he will run for the state’s first elected office. He officially announced his candidacy in a taped interview on WKYT-TV’s Kentucky Newsmakers broadcast Sunday. Quarles, a former state legislator, will follow with a June 1 event in Scott County, where he is from, to outline his agenda for the state. In the WKYT interview, Quarles touted his “strong track record of executive leadership” and said there is an “undercurrent” of dissatisfaction that makes Beshear vulnerable. Beshear will seek a second term in next year’s election, and a recent poll showed the governor receiving high marks from Kentuckians for his job performance. The governor highlighted his handling of the Bluegrass State economy while leading Kentucky through the COVID-19 pandemic. The two biggest economic development announcements ever made by the state – both related to the production of batteries for electric vehicles – came during his tenure. But the governor faces an uphill fight for re-election in a heavily Republican-leaning state. in the countryside. Quarles and other Republicans say he went too far in imposing restrictions for much of the pandemic. The governor says his actions saved lives, especially before vaccines became widely available. Quarles, in his second term as agriculture commissioner, has long been considered a candidate for governor. He has built his notoriety in rural GOP strongholds as he seeks to develop a broad coalition. His entry into the race could signal a flurry of announcements in the weeks and months to come from other Republicans aspiring to win the governorship. At a Republican rally earlier Saturday in County Oldham, Quarles tried to link Beshear to President Joe Biden, pointing to financial pinch because of soaring inflation and fuel prices. will divide allegiances among the state’s growing Republican base. “We know it’s going to be a long process and it’s going to be a crowded primary,” Quarles said on the WKYT program. “And that’s okay. As the Republican Party grows, we have to get more used to having primaries.” State Auditor Mike Harmon announced last year that he would seek the GOP nomination for governor. Attorney General Daniel Cameron, former US Ambassador to the United Nations Kelly Craft senses. Ralph Alvarado and Max Wise, State Representative Savannah Maddox and Somerset Mayor Alan Keck. primary, Alvarado pointed to Ronald Reagan’s so-called “eleventh commandment” not to speak ill of his fellow Republicans. Speaking at the GOP rally in County Oldham, Alvarado pointed out that “if we are 80% in agreement, that we are an ally and a friend and not that we are opposed to 20% one to each other.” “It’s important because the Democrats are going to try to use this against us and keep us divided,” he said. , said Saturday that he anticipates a wide field of GOP candidates for governor next year “I think we’re going to need more ballot paper,” he joked.

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles entered the state’s 2023 gubernatorial race, seeking to cultivate his rural Republican ties into a winning formula in what is shaping up to be a very competitive for the GOP nomination to challenge Democratic Governor Andy Beshear.

Quarles said at a Saturday night GOP rally in Lexington that he would seek the top job in the state. He officially announced his candidacy in a taped interview on WKYT-TV’s Kentucky Newsmakers broadcast Sunday. Quarles, a former state legislator, will follow with a June 1 event in Scott County, where he is from, to outline his agenda for the state.

In the WKYT interview, Quarles touted his “strong track record of executive leadership” and said there was an “undercurrent” of dissatisfaction that makes Beshear vulnerable.

Beshear will seek a second term in next year’s election, and a recent poll showed the governor receiving high marks from Kentucky residents for his job performance. The governor highlighted his handling of the Bluegrass State economy while leading Kentucky through the COVID-19 pandemic. The state’s two most significant economic development announcements — both related to electric vehicle battery production — occurred during his tenure.

But the governor faces an uphill battle for re-election in a state with a strong Republican leaning.

Beshear’s handling of the pandemic will be an issue in the campaign. Quarles and other Republicans say he went too far in imposing restrictions for much of the pandemic. The governor says his actions saved lives, especially before vaccines became widely available.

Quarles, in his second term as agriculture commissioner, has long been considered a candidate for governor. He has built his notoriety in rural GOP strongholds as he seeks to develop a broad coalition. His entry into the race could signal a flurry of announcements in the weeks and months to come from other Republicans aspiring to win the governorship.

At a Republican rally earlier Saturday in County Oldham, Quarles attempted to link Beshear to President Joe Biden, pointing to the financial pinch of soaring inflation and fuel prices.

“If there’s one thing we can all agree on today, it’s that Governor Andy Beshear and President Biden both need to be in office,” Quarles said.

The emerging campaign for the GOP gubernatorial nomination next year will split allegiances among the state’s growing Republican base.

“We know it’s going to be a long process and it’s going to be a crowded primary,” Quarles said on the WKYT program. “And that’s okay. As the Republican Party grows, we have to get more used to having primaries.”

State Auditor Mike Harmon announced last year that he would seek the GOP nomination for governor.

Several other Republicans are seen weighing the gubernatorial offers, including Attorney General Daniel Cameron, former US Ambassador to the United Nations Kelly Craft, senses. Ralph Alvarado and Max Wise, State Representative Savannah Maddox and Somerset Mayor Alan Keck.

With the potential for a bitter free-for-all emerging in the GOP primary, Alvarado pointed to Ronald Reagan’s so-called “eleventh commandment” not to speak ill of fellow Republicans.

Speaking at the GOP rally in County Oldham, Alvarado pointed out that “if we are 80% in agreement, that we are an ally and a friend and not that we are opposed to 20% one to the other”.

“It’s important because the Democrats are going to try to use this against us and keep us divided,” he said.

Kentucky Secretary of State Michael Adams, a Republican, said Saturday he expects a wide range of GOP candidates for governor next year.

“I think we’re going to need more paper for the ballots,” he joked.

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Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller could be in the fight of his political life https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/texas-agriculture-commissioner-sid-miller-could-be-in-the-fight-of-his-political-life/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/texas-agriculture-commissioner-sid-miller-could-be-in-the-fight-of-his-political-life/ Early voting for the March 1 primaries begins Monday, and Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller is gearing up for a re-election fight. Texas Tribune political reporter James Barragan tells the Texas Standard that Miller is being attacked by Republican and Democratic challengers over ethics — namely, his relationship with longtime adviser Todd Smith. Smith was […]]]>

Early voting for the March 1 primaries begins Monday, and Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller is gearing up for a re-election fight.

Texas Tribune political reporter James Barragan tells the Texas Standard that Miller is being attacked by Republican and Democratic challengers over ethics — namely, his relationship with longtime adviser Todd Smith. Smith was recently charged with theft and bribery in connection with an alleged pay-to-play scheme for state hemp licenses — licenses administered by Miller’s office.

“[Miller’s] saying, ‘Hey, keep me out of this. It’s not me, I have nothing to do with it,” Barragán said. “His opponents – James White on the Republican side and Susan Hays on the Democratic side – say, ‘Hey, he’s been your longtime political consultant for 30 years. You must have known something.

For more from the political week in Texas, including U.S. Representative Troy Nehls’ bizarre spat with Capitol police and more, listen in the audio player above.

If you found the above report useful, please consider making a donation to support it here. Your donation helps pay for everything you find on texasstandard.org and KUT.org. Thank you for donating today.

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Lake County News, CA – Katherine Vanderwall named county agricultural commissioner/sealer https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/lake-county-news-ca-katherine-vanderwall-named-county-agricultural-commissioner-sealer/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 08:04:56 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/lake-county-news-ca-katherine-vanderwall-named-county-agricultural-commissioner-sealer/ Katherine Vanderwall. Courtesy picture. LAKE COUNTY, Calif. — The Board of Supervisors has named a new agriculture commissioner, from Lake County, who will also be the first woman to hold the position. Council emerged from the closed session at 3:15 p.m. on Tuesday, January 11 to announce the appointment of Katherine Vanderwall as Agricultural Commissioner/Sealer […]]]>
Katherine Vanderwall. Courtesy picture.

LAKE COUNTY, Calif. — The Board of Supervisors has named a new agriculture commissioner, from Lake County, who will also be the first woman to hold the position.

Council emerged from the closed session at 3:15 p.m. on Tuesday, January 11 to announce the appointment of Katherine Vanderwall as Agricultural Commissioner/Sealer of Weights and Measures.

His appointment takes effect on February 12.

She will succeed Steve Hajik, Lake County’s most senior agriculture commissioner. Hajik is retiring in February after 20 years of service in the workplace.

Born and raised in Lake County, Vanderwall brings his experience, insight, and lived local perspective. She is also a highly connected and respected state authority. This combination holds great promise for a vital local industry, the county reported.

“Agriculture is a key facet of Lake County’s economy, and it’s important to have a commissioner in place who understands the unique opportunities and challenges that our local farmers experience,” said the council chairman. administration, Eddie Crandell. “No one could be better suited to take on this role than Katherine, and we are very pleased that she has stepped up to serve Lake County communities in this new and expanded way.”

For the past five years, Vanderwall has served as Assistant Commissioner of Agriculture and Sealer of Weights and Measures, supporting the work of the department she will soon lead.

In total, she has served Lake County for 14 years, starting as a junior biologist. During this time, she worked hard to expand her qualifications and contributions to her department and county residents.

Now Vanderwall is fully licensed by the California Department of Food and Agriculture as an Agricultural Commissioner and Sealer of Weights and Measures.

She is a past president of the California Association of Standards and Agricultural Professionals and received the association’s Distinguished Service Award in 2021. Vanderwall also holds a Bachelor of Science degree from UC Davis and earned an executive designation. superior of the California State Association of Counties. CSAC Institute, also in 2021.

Many county residents and leaders know Vanderwall for his service on the Lake County 4H Program Board of Directors and his annual Ag Venture presentations.

“It was a great privilege for me to make the motion to appoint Katherine to this critical county leadership role,” enthuses Tina Scott, Vice President and District 4 Supervisor. lived local. Our Board of Directors is truly looking forward to seeing how the relationships and knowledge Katherine has developed will benefit all Lake County residents in the years to come.

As curator and sealer, Vanderwall will rely on effective partnerships with local farmers, gas station and grocery store owners and staff, and other stakeholders to promote sustainable success.

Vanderwall said she would be able to start because of her experience and familiarity with the programs administered by the department and the relationships that have been established.

She said her previous work gave her the opportunity to promote agriculture and protect consumers by enhancing market fairness.

Serving his home county in such a vital role is truly a logical next step for Vanderwall.

“I genuinely care about the well-being of the communities we serve and the staff of the department,” Vanderwall said.

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Agriculture Commissioner Hugh Weathers seeking final term | https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/agriculture-commissioner-hugh-weathers-seeking-final-term/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 20:12:00 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/agriculture-commissioner-hugh-weathers-seeking-final-term/ South Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Hugh E. Weathers speaks at the 2020 Greater Florence Chamber of Commerce Outlook Luncheon. MATTHEW CHRISTIAN/MORNING NEWS COLOMBIA, SC — South Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Hugh Weathers will seek a final term. Weathers, South Carolina’s commissioner of agriculture since September 2004, announced Thursday that he would seek a final term. “I have […]]]>





South Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Hugh E. Weathers speaks at the 2020 Greater Florence Chamber of Commerce Outlook Luncheon.


MATTHEW CHRISTIAN/MORNING NEWS


COLOMBIA, SC — South Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Hugh Weathers will seek a final term.

Weathers, South Carolina’s commissioner of agriculture since September 2004, announced Thursday that he would seek a final term.

“I have had the honor and privilege of serving our hardworking farmers and citizens of South Carolina for nearly two decades,” Weathers said. “I’m incredibly proud of the progress we’ve made, but there’s still a lot of work to do. Blanche and I are incredibly humbled by the overwhelming support from local farmers and the agri-food community. »

Weathers said if re-elected, he would remain focused on the future of agriculture in South Carolina for generations to come by growing and growing local farms, providing market-based opportunities in carbon sequestration and working to combat the difficult effects of COVID-19. had on the farming community.

He was appointed acting commissioner for agriculture in September 2004, appointed permanently in 2005 and re-elected in 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018.

Weathers is a fourth-generation Bowman farmer. He was graduated magna sperm praise from the University of South Carolina in 1978, earning degrees in accounting and finance.

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Three Republicans vying for agriculture commissioner – Corridor News https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/three-republicans-vying-for-agriculture-commissioner-corridor-news/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 22:03:57 +0000 https://gonzalesforcommissioner.com/three-republicans-vying-for-agriculture-commissioner-corridor-news/ Through Bethany blankley | The central square TThree Republicans are running for Texas agriculture commissioner, all claiming to be conservatives. One is the outgoing commissioner, another is the Black Voices adviser for Trump and the third is a rancher with first-hand knowledge of agricultural policies and a political newcomer. The incumbent Commissioner Sid Miller is […]]]>


Through Bethany blankley | The central square

TThree Republicans are running for Texas agriculture commissioner, all claiming to be conservatives.

One is the outgoing commissioner, another is the Black Voices adviser for Trump and the third is a rancher with first-hand knowledge of agricultural policies and a political newcomer.

The incumbent Commissioner Sid Miller is running for re-election after being first elected in 2014. A former state representative, Miller served in the Texas legislature from 2003 to 2013.

One of his challengers, State Representative James White, R-Hillister, sits in the State House after being first elected in 2010.

Carey Counsil, a fifth generation rancher, owner of a local Brenham business, real estate developer, professor of economics at Blinn College and newcomer to politics is the third candidate.

The Texas Agriculture Commissioner, who heads the state’s Department of Agriculture, is responsible for promoting agricultural production, protecting consumers, stimulating economic development, and overseeing rural health programs and school meals, among other tasks.

Miller, perhaps the most controversial, has been a thorn in the side of Republican leaders, criticizing them for failing to embrace the majority of the conservative policies promoted by the Texas Republican Party delegation and for advancing policies they he called it unconstitutional.

In March, Miller was among several Texans who sued Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and the Texas Senate over a mandatory COVID-19 testing requirement. He argued that the mandate was unconstitutional and in conflict with policies implemented by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott, who at the time had just relinquished the statewide mask mandate and declared Texas “100% open”.

Miller also joined another lawsuit against Abbott, after the governor single-handedly changed election law, a power vested only in the legislature, by extending the early voting period to November 2020. Before the election, the Harris County Democrats have implemented a drive-thru. voting system, and those who sued it have alleged an increase in voter fraud due to extended early voting.

A fierce critic of the governor, Miller wrote an open letter to Abbott last fall about his current lockdown policies. He wrote: “It’s time to STOP THE MADNESS… There is simply no logic in continuing to crush the freedoms of the free people of Texas in the name of fear and politics.

White cites his own “experience with agricultural issues and his commitment to integrity and ethics” as one of the reasons he comes forward. A new member of the Texas Freedom Caucus, several of his caucus colleagues supported him, as did House Speaker Dade Phelan R-Beaumont.

White is among 25 state lawmakers who have called for a special fourth legislative session after Abbott and lawmakers failed to address employer mandates on vaccines.

A military veteran, White was a member of the Black Voices for Trump advisory board, is a proponent of tighter border security, lower taxes and bureaucratic red tape. As chair of the House Homeland Security and Public Safety Committee, White was instrumental in enacting unlicensed transportation legislation earlier this year.

In a recent interview with Brenham’s KWHI 1280 AM radio station, the Council explained why it is coming forward: to close the wage and profit gap from producer to distributor to consumer, secure water rights and other agricultural issues affecting all Texans.

He said, “I see a huge disparity between the consumer and the producer, and we need to correct that disparity. There is a huge disparity – what you see in grocery stores and… what farmers actually get. “

Farmers are paid much less than what consumers pay, he said. Grocery stores are raising prices that do not reflect the true value of the products they have purchased, hurting consumers and farmers in Texas, he added.

Another disparity that has not been resolved for years in Texas is the issue of water rights.

The council argues that “the government wants to extract water above the ground, and it is also interested in the groundwater rights of different states, and some states succumb to water rights. I just don’t see that water rights are anyone’s business other than the landowner, so it’s something I want to get out and protect.

The council said it wanted to be a link between Austin and the landowners, and “the mouthpiece for the common man and the common man.”

Appealing to all Texans as a political outsider, he said, “I am a supporter of the agricultural industry. I don’t have a lot of political experience, but I think the average person has had enough of the typical politician.

The nomination period for the 2020 election ends on December 13. The primary election is scheduled for March 1, 2022.


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